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268831 Thomas Bruce <tom.bruce.trb@g...> 2019‑07‑05 New uses for old stuff
Folks:

I've always thought it would be interesting to compile a list of new uses
for older tools  -- not, for example, singing the ergonomic virtues of old
hand saws, but collecting new applications.  For example:

-- Farrier's hammers are surprisingly useful for putting rush seats in
chairs; there's a lot of tacking involved, and the chair rails bounce a
lot, and the combination of extra weight, down-angled shape, and small
striking surface are ideal.
-- I know a guy who cleans up Corian seams with a #80.
-- Yankee push drills are the greatest tool ever invented for putting up
those annoying little brackets that come with modern window shades -- easy
to work with over your head, and easy to get into the corners.

Any interest?  More?

t

-- 
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Thomas R. Bruce
tom.bruce.trb@g...
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268833 "jjb-aia@j..." <jjb-aia@j...> 2019‑07‑06 Re: New uses for old stuff
Tom wrote:

"I've always thought it would be interesting to compile a list of new uses for
older tools-- not, for example, singing the ergonomic virtues of old hand saws,
but collecting new applications."

Most of my tool uses are consistent with their original intents, but I have
found an adaptive use for adjustable brick mason's tongs. While perfect for
carrying many bricks, they also serve as a handle for stove length firewood
rounds. Perfect for those times a wheelbarrow or cart in the woods is not the
right extrication tool. Just a slight bend to the corners of the pressure pads
helps them grab, while not preventing their original use. Old tool content: Mine
are likely half a century old (tag sale find) and they help me perpetuate
archaic heating technologies.

Jack Butkus, in hot and humid Trumbull, CT
268836 scott grandstaff <scottg@s...> 2019‑07‑07 Re: New uses for old stuff
Ohhhhhh I have a new use for an old tool, and its a dandy!!

Once upon a time most water pipes were lead.
Lead pipe had certain things designed for it.
   One of them was a reamer to take the rough burr off the inside of 
freshly cut pipe.

The reamers were steel and as all water pipe went to copper or 
galvanized steel, the trusty reamers fell into disuse, and eventually 
into a "whatsit?"
  Several times a year someone will find one and wonder what in the 
world it is.

Guys have theorized it as a kind of a wood reamer. But the angle of 
taper is too much for most wood uses.
It actually will ream wood when its sharp (and they are easy to sharpen).
  But I don't need to countersink too many holes as big as the working 
rage of these.

  Well the wheels of life slowly turn, and now galvanized pipe is going 
the way off the buggy whip.
But it turns out the classy little reamers are the exact perfect thing 
for taking the burr off of freshly cut PVC pipe! Nothing better.
A quick twist of the wrist and its smooth as glass!

  http://users.snowcrest.net/kitty/sgrandstaff/images/oldtools/pipereamer.
JPG

yours scott




-- 
*******************************
    Scott Grandstaff
    Box 409 Happy Camp, Ca  96039
    scottg@s...
    http://www.snowcrest.n
et/kitty/sgrandstaff/
    http://www.snowcr
est.net/kitty/hpages/index.html
268843 Ed Minch <ruby1638@a...> 2019‑07‑07 Re: New uses for old stuff
I thought they were barrel bung hole reamers, but I have seen so many of them I
always asked myself “who’s reaming all those bungholes”.

Ed Minch
268846 Ed Minch <ruby1638@a...> 2019‑07‑07 Re: New uses for old stuff
More re-uses

A cobblers hammer with  polished dome shaped face is perfect for installing
guitar frets

From Paul Sellars - use a router plane with its final depth setting as a marking
gauge for those depths.  The good news is that now you need another router so
you can leave the final setting on the one used for marking.

Ed Minch
268849 John Ruth <johnrruth@h...> 2019‑07‑07 Re: New uses for old stuff
Ed,

I had also thought those reamers were cooper’s tools, but my understanding was
that they were TAP reamers, rather than BUNG reamers.

My humble understanding had been that the bung stave of a wooden barrel was
bored and reamed by a single tee-handled tool which has a regular screw-auger
nose and then a reamer cone with a single plane-like cutting edge above that.  (
How coopers sharpened that reamer edge was always a mystery! )

The tap hole in the edge of the head of the barrel I thought was bored with an
ordinary auger and then ostensibly taper-teamed for a cork with one of these
supposed “cooper’s tap reamers.”  _I now believe that Scott is correct about
these being lead-pipe plumber’s tools because the taper is “just wrong” for a
cork._

Scott has done it again!  Dissipated an old tool myth with true Galootish
knowledge!

John Ruth
Who will move this tool to the plumbing tote.

Sent from my iPhone
268853 mick dowling <spacelysprocket@b...> 2019‑07‑07 Re: New uses for old stuff
GGs

A slaters ripper is a handy item for sliding in behind items (shaving 
cabinets etc) that have been glued to walls with dobs of various types 
of goop. Sharpen the end of the ripper, or at least get it pointy. The 
ripper can be pushed through most pliable goops, or you can use the hook 
as a crude saw.

What's a slaters ripper? Google.

There are more efficient tools for removing items of walls. A 
sledgehammer for example works quite well.

Mick Dowling
Melbourne


------ Original Message ------
From: "Thomas Bruce" 
To: "OldTools List" 
Sent: Friday, 5 Jul, 2019 At 9:45 PM
Subject: [OldTools] New uses for old stuff

Folks:

I've always thought it would be interesting to compile a list of new 
uses
for older tools  -- not, for example, singing the ergonomic virtues of 
old
hand saws, but collecting new applications.

t

-- 
+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+
Thomas R. Bruce
tom.bruce.trb@g...
+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+
268856 Michael Blair <branson2@s...> 2019‑07‑08 Re: New uses for old stuff
Right you are, Mick!  Actually, for any thing nailed but you can't get
at the nail from the front.  Took me a while, but I finally found one I
could afford. 

Mike In Woodland
268857 Michael Blair <branson2@s...> 2019‑07‑08 Re: New uses for old stuff
John, there are bung reamers, but what  you're thinking of are bung
augers.  Those with screw auger nose are a good deal more recent.  The
earlier bung augers had a screw tip like a gimlet, and sometimes not
even that (those were more like spoon bits). 

Depending on how badly they need to be sharpened, I use a saw file or an
Arkansas stone.  Reamers are easier to sharpen, as they have a blade not
unlike a wooden spokeshave set in a tapered wood core. 

Mike in Woodland
268905 Michael Suwczinsky <nicknaylo@g...> 2019‑07‑16 Re: New uses for old stuff
I’ve used a compass saw to great effect carving pumpkins at Halloween.

Michael

On Mon, Jul 8, 2019 at 7:08 AM Michael Blair  wrote:

> John, there are bung reamers, but what  you're thinking of are bung
> augers.  Those with screw auger nose are a good deal more recent.  The
> earlier bung augers had a screw tip like a gimlet, and sometimes not
> even that (those were more like spoon bits).
>
> Depending on how badly they need to be sharpened, I use a saw file or an
> Arkansas stone.  Reamers are easier to sharpen, as they have a blade not
> unlike a wooden spokeshave set in a tapered wood core.
>
> Mike in Woodland
>
> On 2019-07-07 04:18, John Ruth wrote:
>
> > Ed,
> >
> > I had also thought those reamers were cooper's tools, but my
> understanding was that they were TAP reamers, rather than BUNG reamers.
> >
> > My humble understanding had been that the bung stave of a wooden barrel
> was bored and reamed by a single tee-handled tool which has a regular
> screw-auger nose and then a reamer cone with a single plane-like cutting
> edge above that.  ( How coopers sharpened that reamer edge was always a
> mystery! )
> >
> > The tap hole in the edge of the head of the barrel I thought was bored
> with an ordinary auger and then ostensibly taper-teamed for a cork with one
> of these supposed "cooper's tap reamers."  _I now believe that Scott is
> correct about these being lead-pipe plumber's tools because the taper is
> "just wrong" for a cork._
> >
> > Scott has done it again!  Dissipated an old tool myth with true
> Galootish knowledge!
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-- 
Michael
268907 Kirk Eppler 2019‑07‑16 Re: New uses for old stuff
Gouges, auger bits work well too.

On Mon, Jul 15, 2019, 10:14 PM Michael Suwczinsky 
wrote:

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