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162402 Wes G <wesg@e...> 2006‑08‑07 Galootapalooza is in the record books.
GG's
Just a note of thanks and a link to some pictures from CATS (Chicago  
Artisans and Trades Society Jeff, meets the second Wednesday each  
month ay Slav's shop.) very own Phil Cannon.

The largest Galootapalooza yet. (every year a few more attendees)

Thanks to Don and Larry from Clark and Williams Planemakers for  
coming to the event. They went out of their way and we really  
appreciate it.

Thanks to Mike Urness for the great sushi. YES, hand-rolled sushi at  
a tool event! Delicious!

Thanks to Mike Duchaj (dooo high) for hosting and once again  
providing an incredible venue for us. Eventually we'll run out of  
Duchaj family farms and have to start repeating ourselves!

The list goes on because everybody that came made it a better event.  
Thanks to all.

I'll post a page with pictures this coming weekend.

Meanwhile, here's a link to Phil's pictures:
http://home.att.net/~philcannon/

Cheers,
Wes
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162404 Wes G <wesg@e...> 2006‑08‑07 Re: Galootapalooza is in the record books.
Hi Moshe,
I hope this finds you safe and well.
My traveling forge (the one in the photos) is made from a 12" piece  
of well casing that a friend got me and welded on the 2" black pipe  
that goes into the side at an angle designed to create a vortex  
inside the forge.

The gas is delivered inside the 2" pipe using a 1/4 nipple with a cap  
that has a 1/16th inch hole in it. This has a 90 degree elbow that  
protrudes from the bottom of the 2" pipe. A regulator is mounted  
between the supply and the 1/4 pipe to regulate the flow.

The inside is lined with "KAO Wool" and has a single fire brick as a  
floor. There's also a refractory coating, which I would leave off  
next time I re-line it, since traveling is tough on the refractory  
coating, and it's not *absolutely* necessary.

This is the type of forge on which I learned. The blower is a  
hairdryer, and the forge heats up to about 2500 degrees when I have  
it properly closed off with fire brick.

If you google "Pipe forge" you'll get a lot of information.  
Basically, there are two types of pipe forges: Blown (air is forced  
into the forge like this one) and Venturi which uses the pressure of  
the gas to draw more air into the burner. My larger shop forge is a  
venturi type. It's quieter but it heats up to only about 2300 degrees  
for normal use. I've forge welded with it just to see if I could, but  
it doesn't get that hot very quickly. It's  larger, so I don't take  
it with me.

They're both great to use and fairly simple to make. If you don't see  
enough info after your google search, let me know, I'd be glad to  
tell you more when I have more time.

Wes

P.S. Using several firebricks front and back you can configure  
openings for passing longer work through the forge. Also, were I to  
do it again, I'd drill the hole for gas delivery into the 2" pipe on  
the FRONT, not on the bottom, so it's easier to protect the  
regulator, and it's easier to read same while in use.

On Aug 7, 2006, at 9:50 AM, Moshe Eshel wrote:

> On 8/7/06, Wes G  wrote:
>> GG's
>> Just a note of thanks and a link to some pictures from CATS (Chicago
>> Artisans and Trades Society Jeff, meets the second Wednesday each
>> month ay Slav's shop.) very own Phil Cannon.
>> Meanwhile, here's a link to Phil's pictures:
>> http://home.att.net/~philcannon/
>> Cheers,
>> Wes
>
> GG,
>
> I was always fascinated by metal working, and was wondering about the
> forge, can anyone supply details on how to build a simple one?
> capabilities? Am I jumping ahead of myself and should read some books
> first?
>
> Moshe - clueless in Israel
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