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149209 Steve Reynolds <s.e.reynolds@v...> 2005‑08‑30 Re: Questions about my #220(0)
>From: Wolfgang.Jordan@f...

>This is a drawing taken from the related patent from 1959 (German patent
>No. 1782418):
>http://www.holzwerken.de/museum/jordan/pat_1782418_1.jpg
>This patent actually was my first pointer to this company. Now I also
>have the plane. What I would like to know: Is this the only maker who
>used this kind of depth adjustment? Or is there a similar US patent and
>a plane made accordingly?

Similar, but different:

http://www.datamp.org/displayPatent.php?number=89369&type=UT
http://www.datamp.org/displayPatent.php?number=144823&type=UT

That's the closest art I can find in a quick search.

Regards,
Steve

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149196 <Wolfgang.Jordan@f...> 2005‑08‑30 Questions about my #220(0)
GG,

My question is about the depth adjuster on a #220. I've discovered that
Kunz was not the only German manufacturer who made iron planes. There
was at least one other company, Tillmanns & Maier in Velbert/Rhineland,
who used a somewhat different numbering system. I have a block plane
marked #2200 presumably from this maker, which is a copy of a Stanley
#220. Just last week I bought another #2200, which has a different
adjuster. Here is a picture of the two planes side by side (the plane in
the back is missing its knob and part of the lever cap):
http://www.holzwerken.de/museum/jordan/n2200_2_7.jpg
This is the #2200 with the new adjuster. The screw has a large head
which rides in a slot in the casting:
http://www.holzwerken.de/museum/jordan/n2200_2_8.jpg
Another view of the two different adjusters:
http://www.holzwerken.de/museum/jordan/n2200_2_9.jpg
This is a drawing taken from the related patent from 1959 (German patent
No. 1782418):
http://www.holzwerken.de/museum/jordan/pat_1782418_1.jpg
This patent actually was my first pointer to this company. Now I also
have the plane. What I would like to know: Is this the only maker who
used this kind of depth adjustment? Or is there a similar US patent and
a plane made accordingly?
Thanks for listening.

Wolfgang in Munich/Germany

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aficionados, both collectors and users, to discuss the history, usage, 
value, location, availability, collectibility, and restoration of 
traditional woodworking tools. 

To read the FAQ, unsubscribe, or change email options, use the web 
interface at:     http://www.brendlers.net/oldtools/oldtools.html

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149247 <Wolfgang.Jordan@f...> 2005‑08‑31 RE: Questions about my #220(0)
Thank you, Steve. The first one is close, but different enough. Is it  
safe to assume, that Stanley never used the kind of adjuster on my  
plane? The problem with German tools is, that they are often unmarked.  
My #2200 has only 'Germany' on the iron.

What I'm after is this:
There are tools marked 'JORDAN GERMANY'. While JORDAN is the name of the  
US importer, these tools were made in Germany. Who made these tools?  
Most of these tools I have or saw on ebay have no maker's mark. But  
there are other signs. The most unusual Jordan tool, a no. 3 smoothing  
plane, has a depth adjuster, which is also found on other planes:
http://www.holzwerken.de/museum/jordan/n3_2_2.jpg
I have a #3 just like the Jordan, but marked with 'Tum'. Wade McDonald  
shows a block plane (#103?) with the same mark and adjuster:
http://www.angelfire.com/tx4/MesquiteTools/Info/Info.html 
The 'Tum' mark belongs to the German company Tillmanns & Maier. Whether  
it was written in script or in block letters, I do not know. Because  
this company was advertised as making iron planes and even held a  
patent, I like to believe that this is their mark, and they also made  
the various Jordan planes.
Still more questions than answers.

Wolfgang in Munich/Germany

>-----Original Message-----
>From: Steve Reynolds [mailto:s.e.reynolds@v...] 
>Sent: Tuesday, August 30, 2005 5:59 PM
>To: Jordan, Wolfgang; oldtools
>Subject: Re: [oldtools] Questions about my #220(0)
>
>Similar, but different:
>
>http://www.datamp.org/displayPatent.php?number=3D89369&type=3DUT
>http://www.datamp.org/displayPatent.php?number=3D144823&type=3DUT
>
>That's the closest art I can find in a quick search.
>
>Regards,
>Steve

------------------------------------------------------------------------
OldTools is a mailing list catering to the interests of hand tool
aficionados, both collectors and users, to discuss the history, usage, 
value, location, availability, collectibility, and restoration of 
traditional woodworking tools. 

To read the FAQ, unsubscribe, or change email options, use the web 
interface at:     http://www.brendlers.net/oldtools/oldtools.html

OldTools Archive: http://www.frontier.iarc.uaf.edu/~cswingle/archive/



Recent Search Bios FAQ