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208760 "cowtown_eric" <ecoyle@t...> Oct-03-2010 weekend trash/treasures
Some wierd stuff from the weekend

A nail puller for the real pro!
http://www.oldtoolphotos.com/toolphoto.asp?photo=258 Chrome and
nickleplate, spring loaded jaws, but alas the maker wanted to remain
anonymous. Any info? I scoped out the "nail puller" book on abebooks,
but posponed that decision till I'm further down that slippery
slope....It is a dilemma. Should a cabinetmaker even have a nail puller?

at 39 pages to this tome, no mention of "color photos", but rather
focusing on patent dates and numbers...I'm thinking that this is a
rehash of marginal and easily obtainable info.Anybody care to comment on
this POD tome?

A huge block mount snip......?glass cutter
http://www.oldtoolphotos.com/toolphoto.asp?photo=259

and the black knight back saw #55.......another 55 to confuse the
Stanley collectors..took me 20 minutes to decipher the etch...hence
the green tape note...
http://www.oldtoolphotos.com/toolphoto.asp?photo=260 coasrse crudy
handle included. Methinks i saw "sheffield" amidst the rust.

Maker is unkown...any hints forthcoming?

and a Stanley 12 type2.scraper (sorry-no photo)

Eric in Calgary

Twas a good weekend for Cowtown.

------------------------------------------------------------------------
208765 Kirk Eppler <eppler.kirk@g...> Oct-03-2010 Re: weekend trash/treasures
On Sun, Oct 3, 2010 at 7:34 PM, cowtown_eric <ecoyle@t...> wrote:

>
>
> A nail puller for the real pro!
> http://www.oldtoolphotos.com/toolphoto.asp?photo> Chrome and
> nickleplate, spring loaded jaws, but alas the maker wanted to remain
> anonymous. Any info? I scoped out the "nail puller" book on
> abebooks, but posponed that decision till I'm further down that
> slippery slope....It is a dilemma. Should a cabinetmaker even have a
> nail puller?
>
> at 39 pages to this tome, no mention of "color photos", but rather
> focusing on patent dates and numbers...I'm thinking that this is a
> rehash of marginal and easily obtainable info.Anybody care to comment
> on this POD tome?
>

http://www.amazon.com/Nail-Pullers-Raymond-Fredrich/dp/1420874527

This is the tome Cowtown was talking about. Its actually 440 pages, but
39 pages of patents

Nobody on librarything has it listed. The publisher is authorhouse,
which I believe is a self publishing site. Gary Roberts could probably
add more info to those areas

Kirk in HMB, where the bumpkin traffic was in force today.
------------------------------------------------------------------------
208769 "Peter Evans" <peterrevans@o...> Oct-04-2010 RE: weekend trash/treasures
Book Depository and Betterworld both have the title available, useful
for international buyers because of free/cheap postage respectively. I
suspect most of the pages are the 252 patent diagrams and info; there
are only photographs of 60 tools. Full marks to Fredrich to pulling it
all together and going to the expense of publishing his research.

Cheers Peter Evans Sydney, Australia Skype peterrevans -----Original
Message-----
From: oldtools-bounces@r... [mailto:oldtools-bounces@r...] On Behalf Of
Kirk Eppler Sent: Monday, 4 October 2010 1:55 PM To: cowtown_eric
Cc: oldtools@r... Subject: Re: [OldTools] weekend trash/treasures

On Sun, Oct 3, 2010 at 7:34 PM, cowtown_eric <ecoyle@t...> wrote:

>
>
> A nail puller for the real pro!
> http://www.oldtoolphotos.com/toolphoto.asp?photo> Chrome and
> nickleplate, spring loaded jaws, but alas the maker wanted to remain
> anonymous. Any info? I scoped out the "nail puller" book on
abebooks,
> but posponed that decision till I'm further down that slippery
> slope....It is a dilemma. Should a cabinetmaker even have a
> nail puller?
>
> at 39 pages to this tome, no mention of "color photos", but rather
focusing
> on patent dates and numbers...I'm thinking that this is a rehash of
marginal
> and easily obtainable info.Anybody care to comment on this POD tome?
>

http://www.amazon.com/Nail-Pullers-Raymond-Fredrich/dp/1420874527

This is the tome Cowtown was talking about. Its actually 440 pages, but
39 pages of patents

Nobody on librarything has it listed. The publisher is authorhouse,
which I believe is a self publishing site. Gary Roberts could probably
add more info to those areas

------------------------------------------------------------------------
208770 scott grandstaff <scottg@s...> Oct-03-2010 Re: weekend trash/treasures
The nail puller is nice and all, but that bench shear,........... well,....
  what is up?
   This is the second one I've seen this week!  I have been looking for 
20+ years. Is there a new glut of old shears on the market?

  Is this the full sized model? how long overall?
  How long of blade?
  you suck
  yours Scott

-- 
*******************************
    Scott Grandstaff
    Box 409 Happy Camp, Ca  96039
    scottg@s...
    http://www.snowcrest.net/kitty/sgrandstaff/
    http://www.snowcrest.net/kitty/hpages/index.html

------------------------------------------------------------------------
208788 Scott Stager <stagers@m...> Oct-04-2010 Re: weekend trash/treasures
Heavy duty metal shears - though not as heavy as the ones mounted on
tripods :0)

Pretty common around the blacksmith metal working community. I am
keeping my eyes out for a good one. I think I see a blade of light
between the jaws. Maybe not a good thing.

--Scott

On Oct 3, 2010, at 9:34 PM, cowtown_eric wrote:

> A huge block mount snip......?glass cutter
> http://www.oldtoolphotos.com/toolphoto.asp?photo
-------------------------------------------------
Scott Stager Columbia Missouri

------------------------------------------------------------------------
208789 WesG <wesg@g...> Oct-04-2010 Re: weekend trash/treasures
Eric, I'm dying to know how'd you guess "glass cutter" out of this tool?
;-) It's a bench shear for sheet metal. The turned-down end can be used
in a stake plate, or you can use it like I do and put the lower arm in a
vice and raise and lower the top arm to cut sheet metal. I've used it on
copper up to .032 thick. As far as who made it? I've got a brand new
pair in the basement that's 24 pounds, 40" long, with 9" jaws and it's
stamped "Billings". I've also seen them made by Pexto, like the pair I
use at the shop. They're handy, and they definitely would *Break* glass,
but I doubt thats what you want to do with them.

Cheers, Wes

In Chicago and at: http://galootapalooza.org/

On Oct 3, 2010, at 9:34 PM, cowtown_eric wrote:

> A huge block mount snip......?glass cutter
> http://www.oldtoolphotos.com/toolphoto.asp?photo
------------------------------------------------------------------------
208790 WesG <wesg@g...> Oct-04-2010 Re: weekend trash/treasures
Scott, The ones in the picture are closed, there's no light between
the cutter. The jaws cross each other exactly like scissors. My guess
is that it's paint or tape, or maybe a reflection. (I doubt the
latter, though. it doesn't look like there's any reflective surface on
the tool.)

In July, I found two pairs of NOS shears, one I sold, the other I still
have. I also found a super cool pair of compound shears (NOS as well). I
only need what I've already got, so I moved the compound shear along as
well, at a blacksmith conference in Colorado. The first thing to sell,
actually. They're very uncommon.

Cheers, Wes

In Chicago and at: http://galootapalooza.org/

On Oct 4, 2010, at 9:43 AM, Scott Stager wrote:

> Heavy duty metal shears - though not as heavy as the ones mounted on
> tripods :0)
>
> Pretty common around the blacksmith metal working community. I am
> keeping my eyes out for a good one. I think I see a blade of light
> between the jaws. Maybe not a good thing.
>
> --Scott
>
> On Oct 3, 2010, at 9:34 PM, cowtown_eric wrote:
>
>> A huge block mount snip......?glass cutter
>> http://www.oldtoolphotos.com/toolphoto.asp?photo>
>
> -------------------------------------------------
> Scott Stager Columbia Missouri
>
>
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
> --
> OldTools is a mailing list catering to the interests of hand tool
> aficionados, both collectors and users, to discuss the history, usage,
> value, location, availability, collectibility, and restoration of
> traditional handtools, especially woodworking tools.
>
> To change your subscription options:
> http://ruckus.law.cornell.edu/mailman/listinfo/oldtools
>
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>
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>
> OldTools@r... http://ruckus.law.cornell.edu/mailman/listinfo/oldtools

------------------------------------------------------------------------
208793 "Bill Taggart" <w.taggart@v...> Oct-04-2010 RE: weekend trash/treasures
 

::-----Original Message-----
::From: oldtools-bounces@r... 
::[mailto:oldtools-bounces@r...] On Behalf Of WesG
::Sent: Monday, October 04, 2010 11:02 AM
::To: cowtown_eric
::Cc: oldtools@r...
::Subject: Re: [OldTools] weekend trash/treasures
::
::Eric,
::I'm dying to know how'd you guess "glass cutter" out of this tool?

For use when the glass is still very hot and sticky, not cooled glass.  I
have seen similar big shears used in glassblowing operations.  They are used
when the glass is in a state like pulled taffy.

- Bill T.

------------------------------------------------------------------------
208794 Gary Roberts <toolemera@m...> Oct-04-2010 Re: weekend trash/treasures
Speaking on the POD angle, AuthorHouse is one of the so-called Vanity
Presses. Authorhouse handles the publication and distribution of a self-
published book and I must say, it's a pity that anyone uses them. There
are better ways to self-publish without giving a middleman a cut. True,
there's a learning curve, but it's not so bad.

As for quality, I can't say as I've never bought a book through
AuthorHouse. I assume the company contracts out for printing, which
means it could be any one of a number of commercial printers that offer
POD services. The price of the book reflects the AuthorHouse cut into
the profit margin. The publisher is noted as AuthorHouse, which means
the author didn't buy his own ISBN, so AuthorHouse owns the ISBN for
that particular book, another reason not to use a vanity press.

Gary ............................... Gary Roberts The Toolemera Press -
http://toolemera.com Shop - http://shop.toolemera.com Blog -
http://toolemerablog.typepad.com Hand Tool Makers -
http://handtoolmakers.com

"I'ld rather read a good book, than write a poor one."
Christopher Morley

On Oct 3, 2010, at 10:34 PM, cowtown_eric wrote:

Some wierd stuff from the weekend

A nail puller for the real pro!
http://www.oldtoolphotos.com/toolphoto.asp?photoChrome and nickleplate,
spring loaded jaws, but alas the maker wanted to remain anonymous. Any
info? I scoped out the "nail puller" book on abebooks, but posponed that
decision till I'm further down that slippery slope....It is a dilemma.
Should a cabinetmaker even have a nail puller?

at 39 pages to this tome, no mention of "color photos", but rather
focusing on patent dates and numbers...I'm thinking that this is a
rehash of marginal and easily obtainable info.Anybody care to comment on
this POD tome?

A huge block mount snip......?glass cutter
http://www.oldtoolphotos.com/toolphoto.asp?photo and the black knight
back saw #55.......another 55 to confuse the Stanley collectors..took me
20 minutes to decipher the etch...hence the green tape note...
http://www.oldtoolphotos.com/toolphoto.asp?photocoasrse crudy handle
included. Methinks i saw "sheffield" amidst the rust.

Maker is unkown...any hints forthcoming?

and a Stanley 12 type2.scraper (sorry-no photo)

Eric in Calgary

Twas a good weekend for Cowtown.

------------------------------------------------------------------------
208795 Gary Roberts <toolemera@m...> Oct-04-2010 Re: weekend trash/treasures
Speaking on the POD angle, AuthorHouse is one of the so-called Vanity
Presses. Authorhouse handles the publication and distribution of a self-
published book and I must say, it's a pity that anyone uses them. There
are better ways to self-publish without giving a middleman a cut. True,
there's a learning curve, but it's not so bad.

As for quality, I can't say as I've never bought a book through
AuthorHouse. I assume the company contracts out for printing, which
means it could be any one of a number of commercial printers that offer
POD services. The price of the book reflects the AuthorHouse cut into
the profit margin. The publisher is noted as AuthorHouse, which means
the author didn't buy his own ISBN, so AuthorHouse owns the ISBN for
that particular book, another reason not to use a vanity press.

Gary ............................... Gary Roberts The Toolemera Press -
http://toolemera.com Shop - http://shop.toolemera.com Blog -
http://toolemerablog.typepad.com Hand Tool Makers -
http://handtoolmakers.com

"I'ld rather read a good book, than write a poor one."
Christopher Morley

On Oct 3, 2010, at 10:34 PM, cowtown_eric wrote:

Some wierd stuff from the weekend

A nail puller for the real pro!
http://www.oldtoolphotos.com/toolphoto.asp?photoChrome and nickleplate,
spring loaded jaws, but alas the maker wanted to remain anonymous. Any
info? I scoped out the "nail puller" book on abebooks, but posponed that
decision till I'm further down that slippery slope....It is a dilemma.
Should a cabinetmaker even have a nail puller?

at 39 pages to this tome, no mention of "color photos", but rather
focusing on patent dates and numbers...I'm thinking that this is a
rehash of marginal and easily obtainable info.Anybody care to comment on
this POD tome?

A huge block mount snip......?glass cutter
http://www.oldtoolphotos.com/toolphoto.asp?photo and the black knight
back saw #55.......another 55 to confuse the Stanley collectors..took me
20 minutes to decipher the etch...hence the green tape note...
http://www.oldtoolphotos.com/toolphoto.asp?photocoasrse crudy handle
included. Methinks i saw "sheffield" amidst the rust.

Maker is unkown...any hints forthcoming?

and a Stanley 12 type2.scraper (sorry-no photo)

Eric in Calgary

Twas a good weekend for Cowtown.

------------------------------------------------------------------------
208796 WesG <wesg@g...> Oct-04-2010 Re: weekend trash/treasures
Bill,
I've seen what you're describing done with *hand* shears, (tin snips)  
but I can't imagine anybody hefting a pair of twenty-plus pound  
shears sideways and clipping semi-molten glass.
That's not to say that it can't be done, but since the glass is  
oozing in a vertical direction and these shears weigh A LOT and they  
have no secure means of holding them... I'm going to call a  
"technical foul" and await a photograph as proof that what you say  
actually happens in the real world.
The gauntlet has been dropped.
Cheers,
Wes

In Chicago and at:
http://galootapalooza.org/

On Oct 4, 2010, at 10:21 AM, Bill Taggart wrote:

>
>
> ::-----Original Message-----
> ::From: oldtools-bounces@r...
> ::[mailto:oldtools-bounces@r...] On Behalf Of WesG
> ::Sent: Monday, October 04, 2010 11:02 AM
> ::To: cowtown_eric
> ::Cc: oldtools@r...
> ::Subject: Re: [OldTools] weekend trash/treasures
> ::
> ::Eric,
> ::I'm dying to know how'd you guess "glass cutter" out of this tool?
>
> For use when the glass is still very hot and sticky, not cooled  
> glass.  I
> have seen similar big shears used in glassblowing operations.  They  
> are used
> when the glass is in a state like pulled taffy.
>
> - Bill T.
>

------------------------------------------------------------------------
208797 "Bill Taggart" <w.taggart@v...> Oct-04-2010 RE: weekend trash/treasures
 

::-----Original Message-----
::From: WesG [mailto:wesg@g...] 
::Sent: Monday, October 04, 2010 11:34 AM
::To: w.taggart@v...
::Cc: 'cowtown_eric'; oldtools@r...
::Subject: Re: [OldTools] weekend trash/treasures
::
::Bill,
::I've seen what you're describing done with *hand* shears, 
::(tin snips)  
::but I can't imagine anybody hefting a pair of twenty-plus pound  
::shears sideways and clipping semi-molten glass.
::That's not to say that it can't be done, but since the glass is  
::oozing in a vertical direction and these shears weigh A LOT and they  
::have no secure means of holding them... I'm going to call a  
::"technical foul" and await a photograph as proof that what you say  
::actually happens in the real world.
::The gauntlet has been dropped.

Weeeeeeellll - I'm nearly positive I have seen depictions of similar -
perhaps not identical, but similar - shears used in the making of olde-timey
window glass via the cylinder method.  They would blow a large cylinder of
glass, and cut the end off.  Then the shears would be used to cut the
cylinder up one side, and it would be unrolled, leaving a large rectangle of
flat glass.  

I'm searching for a decent depiction of the process.  I've found it
described in texts all the way back to the 18th Century, but no good
pictures or drawings yet.  

- Bill T.

------------------------------------------------------------------------
208798 WesG <wesg@g...> Oct-04-2010 Re: weekend trash/treasures
Bill
Yeah, I'm sure that happens, but I think you're going to see large  
versions of hand shears, versus an actual pair of bench shears. The  
bench shears are notoriously stiff because they need to be, so as not  
to twist the sheet metal down between them instead of cutting it.
In your described activity, the glass being cut is hanging vertically  
and the shears would be held tilting upward at an angle to cut the  
glass, but keep a safe distance to protect the user's gloved hands.

I think the size of the shears is what we're disputing. We're  
probably both correct.

Cheers,
Wes

In Chicago and at:
http://galootapalooza.org/

On Oct 4, 2010, at 10:45 AM, Bill Taggart wrote:

>
>
> ::-----Original Message-----
> ::From: WesG [mailto:wesg@g...]
> ::Sent: Monday, October 04, 2010 11:34 AM
> ::To: w.taggart@v...
> ::Cc: 'cowtown_eric'; oldtools@r...
> ::Subject: Re: [OldTools] weekend trash/treasures
> ::
> ::Bill,
> ::I've seen what you're describing done with *hand* shears,
> ::(tin snips)
> ::but I can't imagine anybody hefting a pair of twenty-plus pound
> ::shears sideways and clipping semi-molten glass.
> ::That's not to say that it can't be done, but since the glass is
> ::oozing in a vertical direction and these shears weigh A LOT and they
> ::have no secure means of holding them... I'm going to call a
> ::"technical foul" and await a photograph as proof that what you say
> ::actually happens in the real world.
> ::The gauntlet has been dropped.
>
>
> Weeeeeeellll - I'm nearly positive I have seen depictions of similar -
> perhaps not identical, but similar - shears used in the making of  
> olde-timey
> window glass via the cylinder method.  They would blow a large  
> cylinder of
> glass, and cut the end off.  Then the shears would be used to cut the
> cylinder up one side, and it would be unrolled, leaving a large  
> rectangle of
> flat glass.
>
> I'm searching for a decent depiction of the process.  I've found it
> described in texts all the way back to the 18th Century, but no good
> pictures or drawings yet.
>
> - Bill T.
>

------------------------------------------------------------------------
208799 Brian Welch <brian.w.welch@g...> Oct-04-2010 Re: weekend trash/treasures
> I'm searching for a decent depiction of the process. =A0I've found it
> described in texts all the way back to the 18th Century, but no good
> pictures or drawings yet.
>
> - Bill T.
>

Jeez, has everyone on the list lost the ability to do ASCII drawings??
------------------------------------------------------------------------
208800 WesG <wesg@g...> Oct-04-2010 Re: weekend trash/treasures
I for one certainly HOPE so! ;-)
Cheers,
Wes

In Chicago and at:
http://galootapalooza.org/

On Oct 4, 2010, at 10:53 AM, Brian Welch wrote:
>
> Jeez, has everyone on the list lost the ability to do ASCII drawings??

------------------------------------------------------------------------
208801 scott grandstaff <scottg@s...> Oct-04-2010 Re: weekend trash/treasures
Yeah, when they make cylinder glass (still in use for stained art glass) 
they use hand shears to cut the long bubble open and then flop it out 
flat. Tin snips are popular but any heavy shear will do. It cuts very 
easily, but they have to move fast.
Soft glass you can cut with a dull knife, and they do that too for 
nipping off small bites.

These bench shears for metal are up around 30" long and weigh ~30 pounds!
    yours Scott
-- 
*******************************
    Scott Grandstaff
    Box 409 Happy Camp, Ca  96039
    scottg@s...
    http://www.snowcrest.net/kitty/sgrandstaff/
    http://www.snowcrest.net/kitty/hpages/index.html

------------------------------------------------------------------------
208804 "Bill Taggart" <w.taggart@v...> Oct-04-2010 RE: weekend trash/treasures
 

::-----Original Message-----
::From: oldtools-bounces@r... 
::[mailto:oldtools-bounces@r...] On Behalf Of 
::cowtown_eric
::Sent: Sunday, October 03, 2010 10:35 PM
::To: oldtools@r...
::Subject: [OldTools] weekend trash/treasures
::

::Should a cabinetmaker even have a nail puller?

If that cabinetmaker does any rough framing, then yes, probably.  Try that
style of nail puller on your cabinetry and you'll immediately wish you
hadn't.

- Bill T.
- Also watch yer fingers!  Those things should have the words "blood blister
maker" cast into the handle.

------------------------------------------------------------------------
208805 Kirk Eppler <eppler.kirk@g...> Oct-04-2010 Re: weekend trash/treasures
On Mon, Oct 4, 2010 at 1:53 PM, Bill Taggart <w.taggart@v...> wrote:

>
> ::-----Original Message-----
> ::From: <oldtools-bounces@r...> ::cowtown_eric
>
> ::Should a cabinetmaker even have a nail puller?
>
>
> If that cabinetmaker does any rough framing, then yes, probably.  Try that
> style of nail puller on your cabinetry and you'll immediately wish you
> hadn't.
>
> - Bill T.
> - Also watch yer fingers!  Those things should have the words "blood
> blister maker" cast into the handle.
>

About the only use I've found for these beasts is removing nails from
pallets & packing crates, or anything else where you don't care about the
wood.  I have two, and both pretty much thrash whatever they touch.

Kirk in HMB, getting caught up from time away.
------------------------------------------------------------------------
208806 scott grandstaff <scottg@s...> Oct-04-2010 Re: weekend trash/treasures
Didn't you ever use a cat's paw?
They eat a lot more wood than the old fashioned nail puller.
  Cats paw is faster, but these pullers actually do a really fast and 
accurate job when you get the hang of it.
  Small bites of wood on each side of the nail, that's it.
A cats paw takes out a bite about an inch across!

  Champion sized blood blisters they will raise faster then anything on 
earth though. And in a heartbeat of inattention.
One way, you carry them and they are soft as 7-up.
   Turn it upside down though,
  or even slightly past horizontal,
they will bite you like you can't believe.
  Watch it!!
    yours Scott

-- 
*******************************
    Scott Grandstaff
    Box 409 Happy Camp, Ca  96039
    scottg@s...
    http://www.snowcrest.net/kitty/sgrandstaff/
    http://www.snowcrest.net/kitty/hpages/index.html

------------------------------------------------------------------------
208808 Thomas Conroy <booktoolcutter@y. Oct-04-2010 Re: weekend trash/treasures
Interesting. Bookbinders used pretty much the same tool, in large
sizes, to rough-cut binders' board before fine-trimming it with a
plough and press.

http://www.aboutbookbinding.com/Bookbinding-51.html

I have assumed that binders' suppliers just bought shears made for
tinsmiths (the Pexto tinsmiths catalogue from the , but I have never
handled a pair with a bindery provenance, but now I will have to
consider the issue of stiffness. Seems to me stiffness would be good for
binders.=A0

Tom Conroy San Francisco

Wes wrote:

"... I think you're going to see large versions of hand shears, versus
an actual pair of bench shears. The bench shears are notoriously stiff
because they need to be, so as not to twist the sheet metal down between
them instead of cutting it."






------------------------------------------------------------------------
208809 "Jeff Gorman" <amgron@c...> Oct-05-2010 RE: weekend trash/treasures

::  -----Original Message-----
::  From: oldtools-bounces@r...
::  [mailto:oldtools-bounces@r...]On Behalf Of Thomas
::  Conroy
::  Sent: 05 October 2010 06:18
::  To: oldtools@r...; wesg@g...
::  Cc: ecoyle@t...
::  Subject: Re: [OldTools] weekend trash/treasures
::
::
::  Interesting. Bookbinders used pretty much the same tool, in
::  large sizes, to rough-cut binders' board before fine-trimming
::  it with a plough and press.
::
::  http://www.aboutbookbinding.com/Bookbinding-51.html

The drawing reminds me of brushmaker's shears I've used, though the fixed
blade ran horizontally. The bristle lenght was determined by an adjustable
fence attached to the fixed blade. However, I think it had a long wooden
handle.

Just my tuppence happeny worth.

Jeff
--
Jeff Gorman, West Yorkshire, UK
http://www.amgron.clara.net

------------------------------------------------------------------------