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271339 Christian Gagneraud <chgans@g...> 2020‑06‑28 wot' zat iz?
Hello everyone,

I've found an interesting auction that definitely looks like a handled
auger bit, but there doesn't seem to be a twist/cutter. Is it so badly
rusty that it's completely gone?
Or is it a very loooong gimlet? That would be very fragile.
It's made by Cornellius Whitehouse & sons
See https://www.trademe.co.nz/antiques-collectables/tools/listing-2680579
604.htm

Chris
271341 Tim Pendleton <tpendleton@g...> 2020‑06‑28 Re: wot' zat iz?
On June 28, 2020, at 1:50 AM, Christian Gagneraud  wrote:

>Hello everyone,
>I've found an interesting auction that definitely looks like a handled
>auger bit, but there doesn't seem to be a twist/cutter. Is it so badly
>rusty that it's completely gone?
>Or is it a very loooong gimlet? That would be very fragile.
>It's made by Cornellius Whitehouse & sons
>See https://www.trademe.co.nz/antiques-
collectables/tools/listing-2680579604.htm
>Chris

Zooming in on the business end of the bit, one photo appears to have marks, or
striations, in a regular helical pattern suggesting an auger bit.  My guess is
an auger that was 'farmerized'.

You could certainly weld another bit on the end, age it properly and smile,
knowing that some future Galoot will be wondering about it.

Tim
Still doing battle with a voracious band of chipmonks that are munching my
garden.
271438 Ed Minch <ruby1638@a...> 2020‑07‑10 Re: Tally Ho. Bronze casting.
Most of the tricky bits are done.  If you don't get the keel/frame joints right,
then the boat could be structurally compromised, and there are so many different
things happening that you have to stay on your toes.  Remember there are 10(+)
tons of lead hanging off the bottom of the keel.   Planking and decking are
pretty straightforward without a lot of complexity.  My guess is there will be a
pretty fancy interior - lots of cabinetry.  One shot in the video showed the
fellow fairing the inside surfaces of the frames  (so that any palnking that is
installed in there will have good seating) and you could see he was next to a
big varnished Mahogany (?) beam called a carlin.  It bolts to the frames and the
deck beams bolt to it, so it is an important joint, and they thought ahead
enough to varnish it before it went in the boat to make it easier.  If they
varnished the carlin, there should be some pretty cool stuff inside.  We have 40
year old interior varnish in some paces that still looks fine as it gets no sun
and no water on it.

When he was working on the bronze floors, my guess was $5-800 each without his
labor, and at the end he said the bronze alone was $11K and there are 19 frames,
and the labor and equipment had to be another $11K, so over $1,000 each.  This
is a yacht technique, and only the best yachts had them.  I helped a friend
working on rebuilding the very first Concrodia Yawl which was very narrow and 44
feet, so the floors were smaller and much more delicate than these and he just
cut them out of pine and screwed them together and bunged the holes.  His did
not need the stretcher across the top.

I think he is 40% done, depending on how fancy the interior gets, maybe a little
more.  The part he is done with includes a lot of demo and decisions.  The rig
will be fun to watch go together.

Cool story about the Concordia yawl.  It was mahogany planking over oak frames,
built in 1939? so in 1979 it was about 40 years old, but still in very nice
shape.  My friend wanted to strip the hull and varnish it, so he called
Concordai to find out what he could about the hull.  They gave him the number of
the foreman who was on the job, long since retired.  The guy told him that it
was specified as paint grade and the second plank down on the port side was very
pale, so he wouldn't recommend varnish. My friend stripped a section of that
plank, and sure enough it was that yellow/grey that mahagany can be.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/ruby1638/50096043847/in/album-72157651828
962189/

Ed Minch
271443 Mick Dowling <spacelysprocket@b...> 2020‑07‑10 Re: Tally Ho. Bronze casting.
Paul

Galoot years, dog years, or human years? Don’t leave me hanging.

Mick Dowling
271446 Paul Gardner <yoyopg@g...> 2020‑07‑10 Re: Tally Ho. Bronze casting.
Hey Mick,

I'm assuming the running joke on the Tally Ho VLOG is scaled for human
years, but as the answer to the "when will you be finished" question is
always "two years" we may be working with a whole new measurement for
time.  That's a heavy bit of lifting for the noodle of this particular
galoot.  I've been called a "plank" before but never a "Max Planck".

Paul, in SF, who is waiting for the next episode to drop this weekend.

On Fri, Jul 10, 2020 at 3:27 AM Mick Dowling 
wrote:
271447 Bill Ghio 2020‑07‑10 Re: Tally Ho. Bronze casting.
IIRCC Mick was the instigator of this bing watching of Tally Ho. Do you realize
how many collective Galoot hours have been squandered? I’ll bet some of us are
even falling behind on our already glacially slow project progress...
271449 Joe Jerkins <jerkinsjoe@g...> 2020‑07‑10 Re: Tally Ho. Bronze casting.
saw this quip today that fits this esteemed group, "I never finish
anything.  It's almost like I have a black belt in partial arts."

Cheers all.
Joe

On Fri, Jul 10, 2020 at 7:24 AM Bill Ghio via OldTools <
oldtools@s...> wrote:
271453 Dragon List <dragon01list@g...> 2020‑07‑10 Re: Tally Ho. Bronze casting.
bill, i hardly call it "squandered".  it's been a fascinating exercise in
meticulous galoothood, even with the use of tailed apprentices.  i was
bummed when i reached the end of the episodes and was brought up to
current; waiting two weeks vs. binge watching is fraught with wonder.

bill
felton, ca

On Fri, Jul 10, 2020 at 7:24 AM Bill Ghio via OldTools <
oldtools@s...> wrote:
271454 Dragon List <dragon01list@g...> 2020‑07‑10 Re: Tally Ho. Bronze casting.
i'm going to carve that mostly into a Planck and hang it in my shop.  or at
least i'll outline the letters.  or maybe just choose the wood.

bill
felton, ca
271455 "yorkshireman@y..." <yorkshireman@y...> 2020‑07‑10 Re: Tally Ho. Bronze casting.
Well, I’ll confess, among friends, that I spent about 3 days catching up on the
‘Acorn to Arabella’ series of videos where they start from trees and (will) end
up with a boat. Plenty of galootish content - including a ‘how I sharpen my
tools’ few minutes.  They are ‘beginners’ whereas Leo is a boatbuilder, and the
degree of innate knowledge on the two projects is very complementary.

Time I’ll not see again!  Knowledge and ’someone else’s experience’ that I’ll
retain…



Richard Wilson
Near the North Sea.  In Northumbria
271457 Dragon List <dragon01list@g...> 2020‑07‑10 Re: Tally Ho. Bronze casting.
yer a piker, richard :).  i spent about three WEEKS catching up on 71
episodes of tally ho.  i'd go through and watch the earlier ones again if i
had the chance (time is tight at the moment) because of what i've learned
(and what leo learned) during the early days.

but yes, knowledge and 'someone else's experience'...

bill
felton, ca

On Fri, Jul 10, 2020 at 1:23 PM yorkshireman@y... <
yorkshireman@y...> wrote:
271458 Mike Lynd 2020‑07‑10 Re: Tally Ho. Bronze casting.
Richard, if you liked 'Acorn to Arabella', you need to read 'From Tree to
Sea: The Building of a Wooden Steam drifter', 1985, by Ted Frost.
Apprenticed as a shipwright in 1916, he describes boat traditional building
techniques of the 20s and 30s in an East Coast boat yard, with a wonderful
vocabulary of incomprehensible specialist terminology and his own superb
drawings.

best wishes,

Mike

On Fri, 10 Jul 2020 at 21:23, yorkshireman@y... <
yorkshireman@y...> wrote:
271459 Mick Dowling <spacelysprocket@b...> 2020‑07‑10 Re: Tally Ho. Bronze casting.
Hi Bill

Galoot hours Bill, not actual hours.

It’s not possible to squander a Galoot hour. 

Sheesh.

Mick Dowling
271460 Ed Minch <ruby1638@a...> 2020‑07‑10 Re: Tally Ho. Bronze casting.
Most professional boatbuilders I have met are more like Peter Follansbee.
Highly skilled, but only do as much as they need to do to get the job done with
the aesthetics needed.  Leo is a cabinetmaker working ona boat.  HIs knowledge
is tremendous and his tools are just right, but he spends a lot of time.

Ed Minch
271465 "yorkshireman@y..." <yorkshireman@y...> 2020‑07‑11 Re: Tally Ho. Bronze casting.
Oooh - dialect.  

I had to look up piker.  
The tool? or process used to clear out the touch-hole   (scottish usage)  - I
guess that the tool, or process is somewhat like a full size pike, clearing out
someones innards, so to clear your touch-hole, you would ‘pike it’
(english dialect dictionary  https://archive.org/details/englishdiale
ctdi04wriguoft/page/168/mode/2up?q=piker )

on page 500 though, we find that it is indeed a tool.  ’The birse for cleaning
out the pan  and the piker for the motion hole’

I was feeling somewhat honoured, in an odd kind of way, when I consulted Heslop,
and found a completely alternative meaning

PIKE, a pointed or peaked pile of hay made up, like a 
temporary stack, in the hay-field till it can be carted to the 
farm-yard. A pike contains about one cart-load of hay. 
Piker, a builder of hay pikes. 

PIKER, the nose. A cant term. " Had up yor piker.” 

So.  Bill is calling me a nose.  I always thought I had a fine nose - for what
it is.  But beauty is in the eye of the beholder, so I’m not upset.

Hod on though.  More contemporary references exist, and they say 

PIKER
1. (Animals) Austral a wild bullock
2. Austral and NZ a useless person; failure
3. US and Austral and NZ a lazy person; shirker
4. a mean person
[C19: perhaps related to pike3]

and also 

PIKER

1. a person who does anything in a contemptibly small or cheap way.
2. a person who gambles or speculates in a cautious way.
[1275–1325; Middle English: petty thief =pik(en) to pick1 + -er -er1; compare
dial. (N England, Scots, Hiberno-E) pike topick1]



So it seems that Bill DOES know me, and my Yorkshire reputation for being a
tightwad.



I have to say though, that I was watching videos, as I usually do with home made
affairs, at one and half times speed.  The commentary is perfectly lucid, as
amateurs usually drone and drivel too much, and you get back a serious amount of
time.  If the action gets to be interesting or detailed, then you can slow down,
otherwise keep charging on.


And to stay on OldTools ground, the initial set up and hand adzing of the keel
and deadwood was very impressive, as is the planking - and the mistakes they
made, which were as interesting as the good bits - like fabricating the bronze
floors.  Good contrast between the design and making decisions of the two sets
of builders.  Leo turns up at one point, and they evidently have a good working
relationship between themselves.


Richard Wilson
A Tyke oop North.
271467 Ed Minch <ruby1638@a...> 2020‑07‑11 Re: Tally Ho. Bronze casting.
> 
> Oooh - dialect.  
> 
> I had to look up piker.  
> The tool? or process used to clear out the touch-hole   (scottish usage)  - I
guess that the tool, or process is somewhat like a full size pike, clearing out
someones innards, so to clear your touch-hole, you would ‘pike it’
> (english dialect dictionary  https://archive.org/details/englishdia
lectdi04wriguoft/page/168/mode/2up?q=piker <https://archive.org/d
etails/englishdialectdi04wriguoft/page/168/mode/2up?q=piker> )
> 
> on page 500 though, we find that it is indeed a tool.  ’The birse for cleaning
out the pan  and the piker for the motion hole’
> 


> Hod on though.  More contemporary references exist, and they say 
> 
> PIKER
> 1. (Animals) Austral a wild bullock
> 2. Austral and NZ a useless person; failure
> 3. US and Austral and NZ a lazy person; shirker
> 4. a mean person
> [C19: perhaps related to pike3]
> 
> and also 
> 
> PIKER
> 
> 1. a person who does anything in a contemptibly small or cheap way.
> 2. a person who gambles or speculates in a cautious way.
> [1275–1325; Middle English: petty thief =pik(en) to pick1 + -er -er1; compare
dial. (N England, Scots, Hiberno-E) pike topick1]
> 
> 


My 1867 Sailor’s Word Book (one of 2 pretty definitive Englsih sailing term
references) does not have “piker” in it.  It says a pike is the usual weapon,
precurser to the bayonet, or a fish, but that’s it.  On a half dozen ships that
I have sailed in, the small pointed brass rod that pricks open the cartridge
wall once it is in the gun barrel is called a prick, and my book uses this
definition.  But that also may have been what Bill meant.  I have never known
the actual definition of piker, but got a  sense of a general ner-do-well, so it
is good to see it - now I can use the term with purpose and confidence.  And
remember, there are no cannon aboard a ship, only guns.

Ed Minch

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