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269929 Kirk Eppler 2020‑02‑10 Found a fun square this weekend.
Gathered Galoots

While running about this weekend, I found a yard sale that was a bit
intimidating.  From the ad: lots of Militaria, around the back, park in a
commercial lot and walk over (so my accomplices can hide the car later),
call my phone to get in....  Hitting all the buttons to say stay away.
Only things missing were dark alleys, late evening hours only.  Needless to
say, Kim and the dogs stayed in the car, while I stupidly went across the
street.   All fears unfounded, fortunately.  Nice guy, pleasant
disposition, knew what he had.

First thing I found was this cool square with nice brass, and interestingly
shaped in the cut outs.  Blade was in horrible shape, but the stock looked
like it would clean up OK,  Had script lettering on the back side of the
stock, LHMP I think.  Had an oddball gauge on the stock that I couldn't
figure out right away.  Turns out, much later that evening, that there is
also a bevel hidden in the stock, and it swings out, and the little
indicator in the stock shows roughly where you are.  I also grabbed a small
block plane, a Jackson open handled split nuts back saw, in rehabilitatable
shape, a couple of tapered plane blades, and what may be the world's
first-found bullnose hollow plane (or is it a round?).  Never seen dry rot
taken to such a level.  Figure a little smoothing of the front end, and I
could make history.   Or just scavenge the blade and wedge, and call it
done.

Turns out the square is a 1874-1887 Stanley #15, type 1.  Vendor said he
thought it was 17th century, I countered it was late 1800's IMO.  Hope he
wasn't laughing at me too hard inside. Since the blade is thrashed, I see
sanding in its future, which bums me out, but life will go out, especially
if it is square enough for general woodworking.

Pics here.
ht
tps://kirkhmb.smugmug.com/Woodworking/Woodworking-Tools/i-2hv87MJ

He also had a big 4-1/2" Wilton bullet vise, quite frozen up, which I
declined to haul home for $200.  I knew I couldn't carry it to the truck.
The cannonade in the front pathway only got a second look, figured MS was
doing enough frightening of the neighbors for the rest of us.
-- 
Kirk Eppler in Half Moon Bay, who didn't do much else productive this
weekend.
269930 "Ed O'" <edo@e...> 2020‑02‑10 Re: Found a fun square this weekend.
Kirk,

I believe the square you have is actually a McKenzie Patent Combined Square,
Miter Square, and Bevel.  I have had 6 inch and 9 inch bladed ones.  It is
more complex and predates the stanley by about 17 years.

It's in datamp.org as patent No. 17,106 granted April 21, 1857.  See
ht
tp://datamp.org/patents/displayPatent.php?number=17106&typeCode=0

Centered on the blade mine read McKENZIE PATENTED APR. 21 1857 MILIKEN &
STACKPOLE MANUFACTURERS BOSTON MASS.

My notes say "The body is graduated so the bevel can be used to lay out
polygons."  If you go to the patent papers via google patents it talks about
the use of the bevel.

I think they came in 6 and 9 inch blade lengths.

Ed O'

-----Original Message-----
From: OldTools [mailto:oldtools-bounces@
s...] On Behalf Of Kirk
Eppler via OldTools

First thing I found was this cool square with nice brass, and interestingly
shaped in the cut outs.  Blade was in horrible shape, but the stock looked
like it would clean up OK,  Had script lettering on the back side of the
stock, LHMP I think.  Had an oddball gauge on the stock that I couldn't
figure out right away.  Turns out, much later that evening, that there is
also a bevel hidden in the stock, and it swings out, and the little
indicator in the stock shows roughly where you are.  I also grabbed a small
block plane, a Jackson open handled split nuts back saw, in rehabilitatable
shape, a couple of tapered plane blades, and what may be the world's
first-found bullnose hollow plane (or is it a round?).  Never seen dry rot
taken to such a level.  Figure a little smoothing of the front end, and I
could make history.   Or just scavenge the blade and wedge, and call it
done.

Turns out the square is a 1874-1887 Stanley #15, type 1.  Vendor said he
thought it was 17th century, I countered it was late 1800's IMO.  Hope he
wasn't laughing at me too hard inside. Since the blade is thrashed, I see
sanding in its future, which bums me out, but life will go out, especially
if it is square enough for general woodworking.

Pics here.
ht
tps://kirkhmb.smugmug.com/Woodworking/Woodworking-Tools/i-2hv87MJ


-----Original Message-----
From: OldTools [mailto:oldtools-bounces@
s...] On Behalf Of Kirk
Eppler via OldTools
Sent: Monday, February 10, 2020 3:02 PM
To: Tools Old ; BA Galoots

Subject: [OldTools] Found a fun square this weekend.

Gathered Galoots

While running about this weekend, I found a yard sale that was a bit
intimidating.  From the ad: lots of Militaria, around the back, park in a
commercial lot and walk over (so my accomplices can hide the car later),
call my phone to get in....  Hitting all the buttons to say stay away.
Only things missing were dark alleys, late evening hours only.  Needless to
say, Kim and the dogs stayed in the car, while I stupidly went across the
street.   All fears unfounded, fortunately.  Nice guy, pleasant
disposition, knew what he had.

First thing I found was this cool square with nice brass, and interestingly
shaped in the cut outs.  Blade was in horrible shape, but the stock looked
like it would clean up OK,  Had script lettering on the back side of the
stock, LHMP I think.  Had an oddball gauge on the stock that I couldn't
figure out right away.  Turns out, much later that evening, that there is
also a bevel hidden in the stock, and it swings out, and the little
indicator in the stock shows roughly where you are.  I also grabbed a small
block plane, a Jackson open handled split nuts back saw, in rehabilitatable
shape, a couple of tapered plane blades, and what may be the world's
first-found bullnose hollow plane (or is it a round?).  Never seen dry rot
taken to such a level.  Figure a little smoothing of the front end, and I
could make history.   Or just scavenge the blade and wedge, and call it
done.

Turns out the square is a 1874-1887 Stanley #15, type 1.  Vendor said he
thought it was 17th century, I countered it was late 1800's IMO.  Hope he
wasn't laughing at me too hard inside. Since the blade is thrashed, I see
sanding in its future, which bums me out, but life will go out, especially
if it is square enough for general woodworking.

Pics here.
ht
tps://kirkhmb.smugmug.com/Woodworking/Woodworking-Tools/i-2hv87MJ

He also had a big 4-1/2" Wilton bullet vise, quite frozen up, which I
declined to haul home for $200.  I knew I couldn't carry it to the truck.
The cannonade in the front pathway only got a second look, figured MS was
doing enough frightening of the neighbors for the rest of us.
--
Kirk Eppler in Half Moon Bay, who didn't do much else productive this
weekend.
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269931 Kirk Eppler 2020‑02‑11 Re: Found a fun square this weekend.
Wow, thanks Ed!!

I guess I was suffering from Target Fixation last night.  The pictures I
saw looked Kinda Right, but I never zoomed in on the bevel.

Guess I need to do more digging into Google now.  I don't know that my
blade will have any marking, it is pretty rusty.  But lots of reading.

Thanks again!

Kirk in HMB, ending the workday on an upbeat note.

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