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262475 Bill Traynor <bill@w...> 2017‑06‑14 pontypool japanning recipe experiences?
Greetings,

Given the draconian rules around shipping chemicals across international 
borders, Liberty on the Hudson is unable to ship their Black Japanning 
Asphaltum Paint (http://l
ibertyonthehudson.com/pontypool.html) to 
Canada.  So I've been researching recipes and have found this one that 
seems do-able: 
http
://www.woodcentral.com/articles/handtools/articles_117.shtml. BLO, 
Turpentine, and Asphaltum is all it is.

So I'm curious if anyone here has done this before and if they care to 
convey any lessons learned?

Thanks

Bill
262476 Brent Beach <brent.beach@g...> 2017‑06‑14 Re: pontypool japanning recipe experiences?
Bill

Pop Asphaltum into the search field on the oldtools archive and read 80 
posts going back to 1997! Amazing archive. Some names I have not seen in 
a while.

Brent

On 2017-06-14 06:07, Bill Traynor wrote:
> Greetings,
> 
> Given the draconian rules around shipping chemicals across international 
> borders, Liberty on the Hudson is unable to ship their Black Japanning 
> > Asphaltum Paint (http
://libertyonthehudson.com/pontypool.html) to 
> Canada.  So I've been researching recipes and have found this one that 
> seems do-able: 
> > 
http://www.woodcentral.com/articles/handtools/articles_117.shtml. BLO, 
> Turpentine, and Asphaltum is all it is.
> 
> So I'm curious if anyone here has done this before and if they care to 
> convey any lessons learned?
> 
> Thanks
> 
> Bill
> 
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-- 
Brent Beach
Victoria, BC, Canada
262477 Bill Webber <ol2lrus@v...> 2017‑06‑14 Re: pontypool japanning recipe experiences?
Hi Bill,

A couple data points for you:

An acquaintance refurbishes Stanley miter boxes, does a good job, and 
his recipe is the same as the one described.

I bought a gallon, I think, of Pontypool Asphaultum back in 2001.  I 
used it back then to coat a couple of Veritas vises that were green.  It 
worked out quite well.  Back then I repackaged the product into pint 
cans and offered them to the list but had no takers.  A few months ago I 
opened one of the pint cans, noted it appeared to have stored quite well 
and used it again to coat some green Veritas vises.  I baked the vise 
parts, sort of, by sandwiching the parts between a couple 100 watt 
bulbs.  I baked the parts for about a day. They were dry to the touch 
but they did not pass the fingernail test for hardness as suggested in 
your article.  The parts were satisfactory dry and the installed vises 
parts don't get any handling in use so I was satisfied.

About that same time I was discussing old pianos with a restorer and the 
subject of japanning came up.  I explained my experience to date with 
the Pontypool Asphaultum and agreed to perform an experiment to more 
properly apply the material.  I located a cast iron part from a previous 
piano effort.  The piece is only about 1x3x1/2 so easy to handle.  I 
clamped it with vise grips on a pivot nipple on the part.  The product I 
have is very thin.  I had to apply three coats.  For each coat I kept 
the part under a 100 watt bulb and turned it every ten minutes or so for 
about an hour to eliminate any runs or sags.  It had set up pretty well 
after an hour.  After the third coat had dried over night I put the part 
in a toaster oven, used an oven thermometer to set 450 degrees and left 
it there for two hours.  After the baking I found the part to be 
perfectly shiny and hard enough that it cannot be scratched.

The information above doesn't really do you much good because I'm pretty 
sure the current recipe for Pontypool Asphaultum is not the same as the 
2001 recipe.  They insist their recipe today does not need to be baked 
so it is certainly different.

I have enough of the Pontypool to last several lifetimes.  I'm not a 
restorer.  I bought it to paint the vises I bought.  I never expected to 
have a similar project 15 years later.  If I needed to do it again, I'd 
go with the recipe you have.  I had discussed this same recipe with the 
fellow that refurbishes the miter boxes.  He offered,   "About the 
japanning, the recipe you have is a good start. what I do after that is 
add more asphaltum until it is very thick, thicker than maple syrup. It 
can take up to a day before it's at it's final consistency. You can add 
some  powder to it and it seems fine and come back the next day and it's 
like past wax, if so just add more turpentine. The stuff is very 
resilient, I add all three ingredients at different rates and it never 
fails to work. Also, it seems to last forever, never had it go bad on 
me, actually, I don't see how it could.... , the stuff I make needs to 
be baked on at 400 degrees, so It's fully cured in 2 hours "

Hope this helps...

Bill W.
In Beautiful downtown Nottingham, PA
262478 Tom Dugan <tom_dugan@h...> 2017‑06‑15 Re: pontypool japanning recipe experiences?
Why are you buying green vises? They should be left on the vine until ripe.


-T


(Excellent overview snipped, unfortunately, per regulations.)
262479 Bill Webber <ol2lrus@v...> 2017‑06‑15 Re: pontypool japanning recipe experiences?
These were Hungarian vises, which are green when ripe.  Unlike Yankee 
vises, which are blue (true)!

Bill W.
In Beautiful downtown Nottingham, PA

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