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271554 Bill Webber 2020‑07‑30 Painting cast iron lettering
GGs,

There was a thread a month or so back about painting raised lettering on 
cast iron.  I can't fine the thread, though I think I remember most of 
it. What I don't remember was what paint to use, or if it was mentioned. 
  Anyone have a link to the thread?

TIA,

Bill W.
Nottingham, PA
Woodworkers visit me at http://bi
llwebber.galootcentral.com/
271555 Erik Levin 2020‑07‑30 Re: Painting cast iron lettering
http://swingleydev.com/o
t/get/270234/single/  perhaps?
  

I seem to recall something more recent, as well, but can't find it in the
archive


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271556 Bill Webber 2020‑07‑30 Re: Painting cast iron lettering
Thanks Erik,

That's what I remember.  Now if Claudio will provide a little more info 
on the enamel paint he used.  Claudio, are you out there?

Thanks,

Bill W.
Nottingham, PA
Woodworkers visit me at http://bi
llwebber.galootcentral.com/
271557 Claudio DeLorenzi <claudio@d...> 2020‑07‑30 Re: Painting cast iron lettering
Hi Guys
Re enamel paint:
I just used a generic oil based white gloss paint from my local hardware
store, nothing special.  For any of my metal restoration projects, I
typically clean and degrease, then prep with Ospho (any product that
converts iron oxide to iron phosphate).
Then primer/paint.
No brushes used for letter highlights.
Dab it on with a small stiff balled up dauber made from a piece of rolled
up tee shirt.  Don't overload with paint.
A good quality Q-tip also works, but slower.

Remember that it's much easier to recoat a few times rather than applying a
thicker coat (that might run, or fill in the e's or P's  etc).
  On subsequent coats, the paint will tend to stick and flow over the
previous coat of white, so the second coat is actually easier/faster to
apply.
Hope this helps.
Cheers
Claudio



On Thu., Jul. 30, 2020, 7:35 a.m. Bill Webber via OldTools, <
oldtools@s...> wrote:

> Thanks Erik,
>
> That's what I remember.  Now if Claudio will provide a little more info
> on the enamel paint he used.  Claudio, are you out there?
>
> Thanks,
>
> Bill W.
> Nottingham, PA
> > Woodworkers visit me at http:
//billwebber.galootcentral.com/
>
> On 7/30/2020 6:47 AM, Erik Levin via OldTools wrote:
> > > http://swingleydev.
com/ot/get/270234/single/  perhaps?
> >
> >
> > I seem to recall something more recent, as well, but can't find it in
> the archive
> >
> >
> > *** This message was sent from a convenience email service, and the
> reply address(es) may not match the originating address
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-- Claudio
271563 John Ruth <johnrruth@h...> 2020‑07‑30 Re: Painting cast iron lettering
GG’s

Wedge-shaped Cosmetic Sponges are also useful as paint daubers.  Hold the narrow
end, and dip the wide end in a shallow puddle of paint.

You can invert the lid of the paint can to hold the puddle.  

John Ruth
About to degrease and paint a drill press vise in sunny Metuchen, NJ
271564 M H <shadowd@g...> 2020‑07‑30 Re: Painting cast iron lettering
I believe the most recent video from “hand tool rescue”
On YouTube handled is using a combination of paint markers (eg “posca”
branded markers), or using the handle end of a slim paintbrush (or
chopstick) to daub and push the paint around over the cast iron lettering.

—Marc
271569 Kirk Eppler 2020‑07‑30 Re: Painting cast iron lettering
I've heard other people mention various types of sponges for this role.

Kirk in HMB, CA

On Thu, Jul 30, 2020 at 12:23 PM John Ruth  wrote:

> GG’s
>
> Wedge-shaped Cosmetic Sponges are also useful as paint daubers.  Hold the
> narrow end, and dip the wide end in a shallow puddle of paint.
>
> You can invert the lid of the paint can to hold the puddle.
>
>

-- 
Kirk Eppler
271572 John Ruth <johnrruth@h...> 2020‑07‑30 Re: Painting cast iron lettering
Kirk,

The “good aspects” of triangular cosmetic sponges as paint daubers are many.
Convenient size and shape, plus of course one can trim them. Near-ideal texture,
as far as I can see; they hold “just enough” paint and deliver it in a
controllable manner.

Widely available: Pharmacies, Beauty Supply, and Department Stores sell them by
the bag full, which is a lifetime supply for most of us.  ( Share it with SWMBO?
)

There’s no “prep time” for the applicator itself; they are ready to work right
as they come from the bag.

Marc mentioned POSCA Paint Markers.
https://www.poscausa.com/
They look to be even easier to use than my favored Cosmetic Sponges!

John Ruth
271573 Bill Webber 2020‑07‑31 Re: Painting cast iron lettering
Hi Claudio,

Sorry for the late reply, my internet has been mostly AWOL for 4 - 5 
days.  Anyway, thanks for the info.  I need gold paint, so I bought a 
small bottle of Testor Enamel Paint. Pig-in-a-poke at this point, but 
I'll see what I wind up with.  BTW, it is for ages 12 and up; I should 
be good.

Bill W.
Nottingham, PA
Woodworkers visit me at http://bi
llwebber.galootcentral.com/
271575 scott grandstaff <scottg@s...> 2020‑07‑31 Re: Painting cast iron lettering
Painting iron lettering is hardly different from painting glass 
lettering on antique bottles.
   So its in my wheelhouse.

   One shot sign painters paint has no equal. Its crazy opaque.
Second choice, as always, good old Testors model paint. Both are super 
fine pigment and lots of it.

Dabbers and daubers and paint applicators will all work. You can make it 
easy to read the lettering with practically anything.
    But being as they are molded with plenty of irregularities, the 
lettering looks, well often, pretty crappy.

     If you want the lettering to look nice you have to take a 4-0 (0000 
that means tiny) red sable brush, and magnification, and recreate the 
embossing yourself.  Evening out the mold irregularities as you go.
  On the occasions when you want it to look really good?
Because the piece is special and it really deserves to be highlighted?
  This is how.
     yours scott

-- 
*******************************
    Scott Grandstaff
    Box 409 Happy Camp, Ca  96039
    scottg@s...
    http://www.snowcrest.n
et/kitty/sgrandstaff/
    http://www.snowcr
est.net/kitty/hpages/index.html
271576 John Holladay <docholladay0820@g...> 2020‑07‑31 Re: Painting cast iron lettering
Mr. Grandstaff,

No photos?  What's up with that?


On Fri, Jul 31, 2020 at 1:44 PM scott grandstaff 
wrote:

> Painting iron lettering is hardly different from painting glass
> lettering on antique bottles.
>    So its in my wheelhouse.
>
>    One shot sign painters paint has no equal. Its crazy opaque.
> Second choice, as always, good old Testors model paint. Both are super
> fine pigment and lots of it.
>
> Dabbers and daubers and paint applicators will all work. You can make it
> easy to read the lettering with practically anything.
>     But being as they are molded with plenty of irregularities, the
> lettering looks, well often, pretty crappy.
>
>      If you want the lettering to look nice you have to take a 4-0 (0000
> that means tiny) red sable brush, and magnification, and recreate the
> embossing yourself.  Evening out the mold irregularities as you go.
>   On the occasions when you want it to look really good?
> Because the piece is special and it really deserves to be highlighted?
>   This is how.
>      yours scott
>
> --
> *******************************
>     Scott Grandstaff
>     Box 409 Happy Camp, Ca  96039
>     scottg@s...
> >     http://www.snowcre
st.net/kitty/sgrandstaff/
> >     http://www.sn
owcrest.net/kitty/hpages/index.html
>
> ------------------------------------------------------------------------
> OldTools is a mailing list catering to the interests of hand tool
> aficionados, both collectors and users, to discuss the history, usage,
> value, location, availability, collectibility, and restoration of
> traditional handtools, especially woodworking tools.
>
> To change your subscription options:
> > https:/
/oldtools.swingleydev.com/mailman/listinfo/oldtools
>
> To read the FAQ:
> > https://swingleydev.com/a
rchive/faq.html
>
> > OldTools archive: https://swingleydev.
com/ot/
>
> OldTools@s...



-- 
John Holladay
DocHolladay0820@g...
205-229-8484
271577 Ken Wright 2020‑07‑31 Re: Painting cast iron lettering
On 7/31/20 2:44 PM, scott grandstaff wrote:
> Dabbers and daubers and paint applicators

Am I the only one to hear this in Julie Andrews' voice, to the tune of
"My Favorite Things"?

Ken

-- 
If you ever think international affairs make sense, remember this:  
Because a Serb shot an Austrian in Bosnia, Germany invaded Belgium.

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