OldTools Archive

Recent Search Bios FAQ

270495 "dks@t..." <dks@t...> 2020‑04‑15 tool storage
I sent this earlier, but it didn't seem to get through...

So unlike Eric, who's finishing far too many little projects now that he's
confined to quarters, I have been making only a wee bit of progress on
storing/displaying and generally making accessible some of the tools which I use
most often, attempting in my own unsophisticated way, to replicate the wall-hung
panels that were illustrated in FWW not so long ago. This was occasioned by my
deciding to shift EVERYTHING accumulated over the past 30 odd years from one end
of the basement to the other about 16 mos. ago..., in order to gain some natural
daylight in the cave. Anyway, suffice to say, progress has been made at galoot-
worthy speed, but I'm always on the lookout for new, interesting ways to store
and display tools. As result, I was distracted by the many workshop photos that
Claudio D. has posted on the google. In addition to his many completed projects
( about which we should speak ), I was particularly taken by two things

1. the way in which Claudio mounted his cabinet screwdrivers on a simple angled
bracket, in contrast to the more common horizontal strip, and

2. the brackets in which Claudio's many chisels are suspended. It appears the
brackets were constructed of many little pieces held together by dowels rather
than the more common arrangement of holes with slots.

So I was wondering if those were his own ideas, and also whether he was happy
with those particular features?

And then I thought it might also be interesting to hear from others about
storage methods/arrangements which they considered successful or unsuccessful -
and why?

Don
270496 Claudio DeLorenzi <claudio@d...> 2020‑04‑15 Re: tool storage
Hi Don
Thanks Don!
I just cut slots in a strip of walnut, but I broke some along the short
grain, hence the dowels.
The best spacing I found was 1 ⅛” for most (except for the larger handles I
made which needed 1 1/4” spacing).
The easiest way I found to do this was to space out the holes I wanted, and
then to FIRST place some dowels into the board for reinforcement, then
plane everything down nice, then to drill the holes and cut the slots etc.
    I found that this allowed the tools to sit and not fall out of the slot
as I moved the hinged frames or door panels.
The saw slots alone didn’t work very well, since things tended to tip
over.  A 3/8” deep forstner hole (ie flat bottomed) provided some nice
support so the ferrules could sit into the board and not tip over or fall
out.  On some I drilled right through the board (to fit the entire ferrule,
ie a through hole) and just cut a slot through the middle.  Slots are
better than holes; Easy tool removal this way—. I could lift the tool a
half inch or so, and pull the tool straight out.  I didn’t want closed
holes that require a ton of space to pull the tool straight up.

 As far as the cabinet is concerned, I don’t remember, but I probably
copied it from a photo.
  The tool hanging ideas I have come up on my own but the angled hanging
screwdrivers came from Studley chest.  I am also using magnets to hold some
of the things in place.
Cheers
Claudio
270497 Bill Ghio 2020‑04‑15 Re: tool storage
> On Apr 14, 2020, at 10:12 PM, dks@t... wrote:
> 
> I was particularly taken by two things
> .
> .
> 2. the brackets in which Claudio's many chisels are suspended. It appears the
brackets were constructed of many little pieces held together by dowels rather
than the more common arrangement of holes with slots.
> 
> So I was wondering if those were his own ideas, and also whether he was happy
with those particular features?
> 
> And then I thought it might also be interesting to hear from others about
storage methods/arrangements which they considered successful or unsuccessful -
and why?


I built my hanging tool cabinet about 25 years ago and for the paring chisels
made a rack like Claudio’s. Simple to do and effective. Mine is in Poplar and a
tad shy of 1/2” thick (I was probably working in metric and just didn’t know
it). I have had no problem w/ short grain breakage. On the other door I simply
put holes in the rack and drop the various narrow chisels (1/4, 1/8, skews) and
drawbore pins in.

Cabinet: https://www.flickr.com/photos/77280442@N.../49776950156/in/dateposted/

Chisel rack: https://www.flickr.com/photos/77280442@N.../49777279357/in/photos
tream/
Smalls rack: https://www.flickr.com/photos/77280442@N.../49776950736/in/photos
tream/  (OMG, looking at this photo I just found a missing tool!)

The tool cabinet has been shown here before. Here an album of it I made about
ten years ago:
https://www.flickr.com/photos/77280442@N.../albums/7215763253886
0794/with/8386090585/

I used to have a bench w/ a tool tray and I liked having the tool tray to hold
lots of small stuff, but it often got in the way. When I built my new bench, I
missed the tool tray so I made a narrow bench that sits behind me. Easy to reach
back to grab the marking and measuring stuff & etc. Since no work takes place
there, it accumulates lots of detritus. But it also holds a rack of bench
chisels.

Table: https://www.flickr.com/photos/77280442@N.../49777279777/in/photostream/

Chisel rack: https://www.flickr.com/photos/77280442@N.../49777279642/in/photos
tream/

For this rack I pierced the board w/ holes then reamed the hols lightly w/ my
tapered reamer to provide a seat for the chisel socket. Then I ripped the board
in half and glued it back together w/ a spacer to gain width at the holes. This
pic gives a good view of the spacer: https://www.flickr.com/photos/77280442@N.
../49777279542/in/photostream/

At the back of the table is a strip of tool slots to hold various squares and/or
chisels. This rack has projections on the bottom that drop into slots to keep it
from tipping. The projecting bits are on a pivot so that if I want to carry the
rack somehere they can be rotated out of the way and it will sit flat.
Originally it was a single row but as I added chisels to the set (all PEXTO) I
added a second row. This pic just shows the slots: https://www.flickr.com/phot
os/77280442@N.../49777279542/in/photostream/

My Japanese chisels live in their own separate box: https://www.flickr.com/phot
os/77280442@N.../49776492093/in/dateposted/

The lid lifts off, rotate 90* and it becomes a mount for the base that puts the
chisels at an angle for easy reach:
https://www.flickr.com/photos/77280442@N.../49776491903/in/photostream/
https://www.flickr.com/photos/77280442@N.../49777354467/in/dateposted/


Bill
270968 Chuck Taylor 2020‑05‑22 Re: tool storage
Gentle Galoots,

I was quite impressed by Bill Ghio's chisel storage rack.

 On Wednesday, April 15, 2020, Bill Ghio wrote: 

====begin heavily snipped quote====

Chisel rack: 

https://www.flickr.com/photos/77280442@N.../49777279642/in/photostream/

For this rack I pierced the board w/ holes then reamed the holes lightly w/ my
tapered reamer to provide a seat for the chisel socket. Then I ripped the board
in half and glued it back together w/ a spacer to gain width at the holes. This
pic gives a good view of the spacer:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/77280442@N.../49777279542/in/photostream/

At the back of the table is a strip of tool slots to hold various squares and/or
chisels. This rack has projections on the bottom that drop into slots to keep it
from tipping. The projecting bits are on a pivot so that if I want to carry the
rack somewhere they can be rotated out of the way and it will sit flat.
Originally it was a single row but as I added chisels to the set (all PEXTO) I
added a second row.

====end heavily snipped quote====

That looked like something I would like to have in my shop, so I set about
making a similar rack:

https:/
/www.dropbox.com/s/nuyow49h2l1jspu/ChiselRack1.jpg?dl=0

Bill showed off some nice PEXTO chisels in his rack. What you see in my rack is
my working set of relatively modern European bevel-edge chisels. The one
exception is the Stanley socket chisel on the far right whose business end I
reground to fit in the corners of dovetail sockets. The 1/8" chisel is a
Mathieson. The others are French (Stanley Goldenberg), and German (MHG and
Herba). I picked up the 12mm Stanley Goldenberg at a PNTC meeting and liked it
so well I built a harlequin set of similar chisels.  (Consider this a WTB for
other sizes of Stanley Goldenberg and MHG chisels.)

Bill put his rack in slots at the back of a work table behind his workbench. I
decided to put mine at the back of my main workbench, so I fastened a full-
length (8') apron to the back of my bench with 3/8" spacers. It is easily
removable when it gets in the way. Other things fit in the slots too.

The back view of the rack shows the pivoting tabs that fit into the slots:

https:/
/www.dropbox.com/s/6zo98nyhqqclieg/ChiselRack2.jpg?dl=0

Notice that there are also a couple of iron straps on the back of the rack. That
is so that I can store the rack and its contents on a magnetic strip on the shop
wall along with some of my other chisels.

https:/
/www.dropbox.com/s/m1aqyuxth6sr7dy/ChiselRack3.jpg?dl=0

Thanks, Bill, for the inspiration!

This report is a bit overdue, but I work on Galoot Standard Time.

Cheers,
Chuck Taylor
still holed up north of Seattle, USA
270969 Ed Minch <ruby1638@a...> 2020‑05‑22 Re: tool storage
> On May 22, 2020, at 2:48 PM, Chuck Taylor via OldTools  wrote:
> 
> This report is a bit overdue, but I work on Galoot Standard Time.

Very nice Chuck.  What are those funny numbers on your chisels?  6?  16?  Are
they sized like augers?  What sorcery is this?

Ed Minch
270970 Chuck Taylor 2020‑05‑22 Re: tool storage
Ed Minch wrote: 

> What are those funny numbers on your chisels?  6?  16?  Are they sized 
> like augers?  What sorcery is this?

It's metric sorcery, Ed! The Stanley Goldenbergs are marked 6, 12, and 18 mm on
their handles. The others have their sizes etched on the blades, 5/8" and 1" for
the MHGs and 10mm for the Herba.

Chuck
270972 Ed Minch <ruby1638@a...> 2020‑05‑22 Re: tool storage
I think I haave a couple of Goldenberg tools down there that I picked up in
Italy - any interest??

Ed

Recent Search Bios FAQ