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268109 Michael Suwczinsky <nicknaylo@g...> 2019‑03‑14 Oldest plane
At least the oldest I've ever found in the wild. A type 4 4 1/2 C plane, at
least according to the type study flow chart. I'm assuming 1885 due to the
lateral adjust lever,

https://www.f
lickr.com/photos/10735775@N.../47363728021/

ridden hard and put away wet!  The iron is tapered with an anvil logo
splitting up the word TRADE   MARK

and there's a big chip out of one cheek, a missing front knob and the boss
filled with dirt so crusted over  I'd assumed the threaded rod was broken
off  and rusted in place. Mineral spirits and toothpicks cleaned it out.
https://www.f
lickr.com/photos/10735775@N.../47310971252/

But with nothing more than a cursory cleaning and not touching the iron, it
took shavings from pine,
https://www.f
lickr.com/photos/10735775@N.../47310971102/

Telling me that this is a plane that wants to go back to work! $10 for the
pile that included a Surform, welding gloves and a book on stone knives
(the paleo archer guys will like that one)

Haven't been this excited about an old iron plane in long while.

-- 
Michael
268110 Michael Blair <branson2@s...> 2019‑03‑14 Re: Oldest plane
Great find!  Wonder where it's been hiding all these years.  The 4 1/2
is a sweet plane!

Mike in Woodland
268112 Kirk Eppler 2019‑03‑14 Re: Oldest plane
On Thu, Mar 14, 2019 at 12:37 PM Michael Suwczinsky 
wrote:

> At least the oldest I've ever found in the wild. A type 4 4 1/2 C plane, at
> least according to the type study flow chart. I'm assuming 1885 due to the
> lateral adjust lever,
>
> > https://w
ww.flickr.com/photos/10735775@N.../47363728021/
>
>
> and there's a big chip out of one cheek, a missing front knob and the boss
> filled with dirt so crusted over
>

Nice find.  Maybe Bill will give you the golf ball.

The only DAT listing for an anvil on a plane iron seems to be Riverside
Tools of NY, but that had their name in the anvil.  Others report only the
letters R T, which I think I see there, so maybe.  DAT has not dates on the
iron, but pre 1900 is the mantra, so even the replacement is old as all get
out.

I found an 1892 date for Riverside getting their trademark.


-- 
Kirk Eppler in HMB, dealing with skunk residual on the dogs today
268113 Ed Minch <ruby1638@a...> 2019‑03‑14 Re: Oldest plane
Fun find.  The front knob will be hard to find, but as a user, even a tall one
will do.

Ed
268114 <gtgrouch@r...> 2019‑03‑14 Re: Oldest plane
There was only a year or so during which #4 1/2 Type 4 planes were made. 

If there is no number cast into the plane bottom, then it is a true Type 4 and
not merely a later plane with a replacement frog.

Wonderful find, even if is rough shape!

Gary Katsanis
Albion New York, USA

---- Ed Minch  wrote: 

=============
Fun find.  The front knob will be hard to find, but as a user, even a tall one
will do.

Ed

> On Mar 14, 2019, at 3:35 PM, Michael Suwczinsky  wrote:
> 
> At least the oldest I've ever found in the wild. A type 4 4 1/2 C plane, at
> least according to the type study flow chart. I'm assuming 1885 due to the
> lateral adjust lever,
> 
> > https://w
ww.flickr.com/photos/10735775@N.../47363728021/
> 
> ridden hard and put away wet!  The iron is tapered with an anvil logo
> splitting up the word TRADE   MARK
> 
> and there's a big chip out of one cheek, a missing front knob and the boss
> filled with dirt so crusted over  I'd assumed the threaded rod was broken
> off  and rusted in place. Mineral spirits and toothpicks cleaned it out.
> > https://w
ww.flickr.com/photos/10735775@N.../47310971252/
> 
> But with nothing more than a cursory cleaning and not touching the iron, it
> took shavings from pine,
> > https://w
ww.flickr.com/photos/10735775@N.../47310971102/
> 
> Telling me that this is a plane that wants to go back to work! $10 for the
> pile that included a Surform, welding gloves and a book on stone knives
> (the paleo archer guys will like that one)
> 
> Haven't been this excited about an old iron plane in long while.
> 
> -- 
> Michael
> ------------------------------------------------------------------------
> OldTools is a mailing list catering to the interests of hand tool
> aficionados, both collectors and users, to discuss the history, usage,
> value, location, availability, collectibility, and restoration of
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> 
> > OldTools archive: https://swingleydev.
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> 
> OldTools@s...

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268115 Michael Suwczinsky <nicknaylo@g...> 2019‑03‑14 Re: Oldest plane
Great idea Tom,

"You might be able to remake the cam lever without having to replace the
entire lever cap. Or maybe using a thumbscrew or knurled screw"

I'd thought of maybe seeing if the lever cap from a 6 or 7 might fit. but I
think I might be able to forge and file the thumb lever for the lever cap,
and if that doesn't work, a thumbscrew would let me have fun cutting
threads!

Kirk's comment refers to the time Bill K picked up a 4 1/2 at the Alameda
Flea, with a golf ball for a front knob for a piddling amount.  I'm sure I
can turn a knob, though I'm hoping I have a donor plane for the bolt, and I
might just screw a golf ball on there for the funny

Michael


On Thu, Mar 14, 2019 at 2:13 PM Ed Minch  wrote:

> Fun find.  The front knob will be hard to find, but as a user, even a tall
> one will do.
>
> Ed
>
> > On Mar 14, 2019, at 3:35 PM, Michael Suwczinsky 
> wrote:
> >
> > At least the oldest I've ever found in the wild. A type 4 4 1/2 C plane,
> at
> > least according to the type study flow chart. I'm assuming 1885 due to
> the
> > lateral adjust lever,
> >
> > > https:/
/www.flickr.com/photos/10735775@N.../47363728021/
> >
> > ridden hard and put away wet!  The iron is tapered with an anvil logo
> > splitting up the word TRADE   MARK
> >
> > and there's a big chip out of one cheek, a missing front knob and the
> boss
> > filled with dirt so crusted over  I'd assumed the threaded rod was broken
> > off  and rusted in place. Mineral spirits and toothpicks cleaned it out.
> > > https:/
/www.flickr.com/photos/10735775@N.../47310971252/
> >
> > But with nothing more than a cursory cleaning and not touching the iron,
> it
> > took shavings from pine,
> > > https:/
/www.flickr.com/photos/10735775@N.../47310971102/
> >
> > Telling me that this is a plane that wants to go back to work! $10 for
> the
> > pile that included a Surform, welding gloves and a book on stone knives
> > (the paleo archer guys will like that one)
> >
> > Haven't been this excited about an old iron plane in long while.
> >
> > --
> > Michael
> > ------------------------------------------------------------------------
> > OldTools is a mailing list catering to the interests of hand tool
> > aficionados, both collectors and users, to discuss the history, usage,
> > value, location, availability, collectibility, and restoration of
> > traditional handtools, especially woodworking tools.
> >
> > To change your subscription options:
> > > https
://oldtools.swingleydev.com/mailman/listinfo/oldtools
> >
> > To read the FAQ:
> > > https://swingleydev.com
/archive/faq.html
> >
> > > OldTools archive: https://swingleyde
v.com/ot/
> >
> > OldTools@s...
>
>

-- 
Michael
268117 Thomas Conroy 2019‑03‑15 Re: Oldest plane
I still like what I did with a #3, an infill-style cushion that fills sup the
area between the isdes. But I like getting my weight over the plane, as is
possible with a low knob, so the infill style suits me. With yours, in fact you
aren't constrainedd; you could do a real golf ball, or an imitation one. or
something tall and twisty like what a German plane has, or a swan-boat scroll
like a Dutch plane, You could even get [shudder] creative. Do something in iron.
How about a flying dragon for your front knob?
Tom


   On Thursday, March 14, 2019, 3:05:28 PM PDT, Michael Suwczinsky
 wrote:
 
 Great idea Tom,
 "You might be able to remake the cam lever without having to replace the entire
lever cap. Or maybe using a thumbscrew or knurled screw"

I'd thought of maybe seeing if the lever cap from a 6 or 7 might fit. but I
think I might be able to forge and file the thumb lever for the lever cap, and
if that doesn't work, a thumbscrew would let me have fun cutting threads!

Kirk's comment refers to the time Bill K picked up a 4 1/2 at the Alameda Flea,
with a golf ball for a front knob for a piddling amount.  I'm sure I can turn a
knob, though I'm hoping I have a donor plane for the bolt, and I might just
screw a golf ball on there for the funny
Michael


On Thu, Mar 14, 2019 at 2:13 PM Ed Minch  wrote:

Fun find.  The front knob will be hard to find, but as a user, even a tall one
will do.

Ed

> On Mar 14, 2019, at 3:35 PM, Michael Suwczinsky  wrote:
> 
> At least the oldest I've ever found in the wild. A type 4 4 1/2 C plane, at
> least according to the type study flow chart. I'm assuming 1885 due to the
> lateral adjust lever,
> 
> > https://w
ww.flickr.com/photos/10735775@N.../47363728021/
> 
> ridden hard and put away wet!  The iron is tapered with an anvil logo
> splitting up the word TRADE   MARK
> 
> and there's a big chip out of one cheek, a missing front knob and the boss
> filled with dirt so crusted over  I'd assumed the threaded rod was broken
> off  and rusted in place. Mineral spirits and toothpicks cleaned it out.
> > https://w
ww.flickr.com/photos/10735775@N.../47310971252/
> 
> But with nothing more than a cursory cleaning and not touching the iron, it
> took shavings from pine,
> > https://w
ww.flickr.com/photos/10735775@N.../47310971102/
> 
> Telling me that this is a plane that wants to go back to work! $10 for the
> pile that included a Surform, welding gloves and a book on stone knives
> (the paleo archer guys will like that one)
> 
> Haven't been this excited about an old iron plane in long while.
> 
> -- 
> Michael
> ------------------------------------------------------------------------
> OldTools is a mailing list catering to the interests of hand tool
> aficionados, both collectors and users, to discuss the history, usage,
> value, location, availability, collectibility, and restoration of
> traditional handtools, especially woodworking tools.
> 
> To change your subscription options:
> > https:/
/oldtools.swingleydev.com/mailman/listinfo/oldtools
> 
> To read the FAQ:
> > https://swingleydev.com/a
rchive/faq.html
> 
> > OldTools archive: https://swingleydev.
com/ot/
> 
> OldTools@s...




-- 
Michael 
_______________________________________________
Ba-galoots mailing list
Ba-galoots@l...
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268119 Dragon List <dragon01list@g...> 2019‑03‑15 Re: Oldest plane
michael,

i assume the pin that holds the lever cap lever is driven in, and could be
cut/drilled out.  a lever from a similar (though of course not as wide,
though perhaps) extra lever cap you might have lying around could be placed
and a new pin driven in.  that way you keep the original cap, and have an
original stanley lever.  that, or replace the entire thing with the cap
from a 6 or 7, which are the same width (unknown about their length).  i
think i have a spare if you test it and find one does work, and you want to
go that way.

and, of course, if you'd like the golf ball, i do believe it is kicking
around my shop.  i replaced the handle with a low knob that fit from a
busted number 6 (hence the extra lever cap i believe i still have).

nice find.  i do like that corrugated.

bill
felton, ca

On Thu, Mar 14, 2019 at 3:05 PM Michael Suwczinsky 
wrote:
268120 <gtgrouch@r...> 2019‑03‑15 Re: Oldest plane
I looked at the pictures originally posted for this plane, and I'm puzzled.  

I thought that Stanley began to put numbers on the main casting in about 1885,
with Type 5.  Since this plane has no number, it seems like it would predate
1885.

However, the plane is corrugated, and the corrugations look righteous: at a
glance in a single picture, they seem original rather than added by a creative
owner.

But Stanley didn't add corrugations to planes until the 1890s, at least I
thought.

Sorry if I missed some of the discussion; can any of the real experts out there
clarify the features for me?

Gary Katsanis
Puzzled and losing sleep in Albion New York, USA

> >
> > > On Mar 14, 2019, at 3:35 PM, Michael Suwczinsky 
> > wrote:
> > >
> > > At least the oldest I've ever found in the wild. A type 4 4 1/2 C
> plane,
> > at
> > > least according to the type study flow chart. I'm assuming 1885 due to
> > the
> > > lateral adjust lever,
> > >
> > > > https
://www.flickr.com/photos/10735775@N.../47363728021/
> > >
> > > ridden hard and put away wet!  The iron is tapered with an anvil logo
> > > splitting up the word TRADE   MARK
> > >
> > > and there's a big chip out of one cheek, a missing front knob and the
> > boss
> > > filled with dirt so crusted over  I'd assumed the threaded rod was
> broken
> > > off  and rusted in place. Mineral spirits and toothpicks cleaned it
> out.
> > > > https
://www.flickr.com/photos/10735775@N.../47310971252/
> > >
> > > But with nothing more than a cursory cleaning and not touching the
> iron,
> > it
> > > took shavings from pine,
> > > > https
://www.flickr.com/photos/10735775@N.../47310971102/
> > >
> > > Telling me that this is a plane that wants to go back to work! $10 for
> > the
> > > pile that included a Surform, welding gloves and a book on stone knives
> > > (the paleo archer guys will like that one)
> > >
> > > Haven't been this excited about an old iron plane in long while.
> > >
> > > --
> > > Michael
> > >
> ------------------------------------------------------------------------
> > > OldTools is a mailing list catering to the interests of hand tool
> > > aficionados, both collectors and users, to discuss the history, usage,
> > > value, location, availability, collectibility, and restoration of
> > > traditional handtools, especially woodworking tools.
> > >
> > > To change your subscription options:
> > > > htt
ps://oldtools.swingleydev.com/mailman/listinfo/oldtools
> > >
> > > To read the FAQ:
> > > > https://swingleydev.c
om/archive/faq.html
> > >
> > > > OldTools archive: https://swingley
dev.com/ot/
> > >
> > > OldTools@s...
> >
> >
>
> --
> Michael
> ------------------------------------------------------------------------
> OldTools is a mailing list catering to the interests of hand tool
> aficionados, both collectors and users, to discuss the history, usage,
> value, location, availability, collectibility, and restoration of
> traditional handtools, especially woodworking tools.
>
> To change your subscription options:
> > https:/
/oldtools.swingleydev.com/mailman/listinfo/oldtools
>
> To read the FAQ:
> > https://swingleydev.com/a
rchive/faq.html
>
> > OldTools archive: https://swingleydev.
com/ot/
>
> OldTools@s...
>
------------------------------------------------------------------------
OldTools is a mailing list catering to the interests of hand tool
aficionados, both collectors and users, to discuss the history, usage,
value, location, availability, collectibility, and restoration of
traditional handtools, especially woodworking tools.

To change your subscription options:
https://old
tools.swingleydev.com/mailman/listinfo/oldtools

To read the FAQ:
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OldTools archive: https://swingleydev.com/
ot/

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