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265991 Christopher Dunn <christopherdunn123@g...> 2018‑06‑08 Using a lock mortise or swans neck chisel
Galoots

I've got some deep blind mortises and I'd like to clean up the
bottoms. You're probably thinking that nobody will ever see the
bottoms so why bother? I'm not sure I can sleep soundly knowing my
mortise bottoms are unkempt (dirty clothes all over the place, that's
fine, but unkempt mortise bottoms are certainly not). So I bought a
lock mortise (or swans neck) chisel.

I figured, how hard can it be? It's got an end that will cut me, and
an end that won't. Apparently it's pretty hard cause I can't figure
out how to use it!!!!

So how do you use it?

Do you hold the handle with two hands and dig with it?

Is the curved part for prying?

Do you hit it with a mallet?

The handle doesn't have any dents in it, so the previous owner didn't
hit it with a mallet. Or perhaps they were as stumped as I am and set
it on a shelf?

Confused,
Chris
265992 Bill Ghio <bghio@m...> 2018‑06‑08 Re: Using a lock mortise or swans neck chisel
Sent from my iPad

> On Jun 7, 2018, at 7:30 PM, Christopher Dunn  wrote:
> 
> Galoots
> 
> I've got some deep blind mortises and I'd like to clean up the
> bottoms. You're probably thinking that nobody will ever see the
> bottoms so why bother? I'm not sure I can sleep soundly knowing my
> mortise bottoms are unkempt (dirty clothes all over the place, that's
> fine, but unkempt mortise bottoms are certainly not). So I bought a
> lock mortise (or swans neck) chisel.
> 
> I figured, how hard can it be? It's got an end that will cut me, and
> an end that won't. Apparently it's pretty hard cause I can't figure
> out how to use it!!!!
> 
> So how do you use it?
> 
> Do you hold the handle with two hands and dig with it?
One or two as it suits you. 

> Is the curved part for prying?
Yep
> 
> Do you hit it with a mallet?
Nope

Bill
265993 "John M Johnston (jmjhnstn)" <jmjhnstn@m...> 2018‑06‑08 Re: Using a lock mortise or swans neck chisel
As for sharpening, see Lee’s book on sharpening. Also, Mike  Wenzloff writes
this:
Due to the shape of what would be called the bevel, they are easiest to sharpen
either with the side of a grinding wheel (light pressure) or by using a stone
set near the edge of the bench and the chisel's "bevel" oriented so the handle
is over the edge.

A swan neck chisel (or, lock mortise chisel) doesn't need a high degree of
sharpness. It is a scraping tool designed for cleaning out bottoms of mortises.
I usually leave it as is off the grinder.

Cheers
John

“P.S. If you do not receive this, of course it must have been miscarried;
therefore I beg you to write and let me know.” - Sir Boyle Roche, M.P.
265994 Christopher Dunn <christopherdunn123@g...> 2018‑06‑08 Re: Using a lock mortise or swans neck chisel
Bill and John

So it's a scraping tool, not a chopping tool. That's probably why it's
cutting edge is nearly perpendicular to the end of the chisel.

I'll give it a shot this weekend.

Thanks for your help,
Chris
265998 Michael Blair <branson2@s...> 2018‑06‑09 Re: Using a lock mortise or swans neck chisel
> So it's a scraping tool, not a chopping tool. That's probably why it's cutting
edge is nearly perpendicular to the end of the chisel.

I wouldn't call it a "scraping tool."  There are two forms of lock
mortise chisel.  The more modern form is like this one.  The image shows
how to use it.  The older form works the same way. but usually has a
sharper edge. 

http
://toolmonger.com/2007/12/10/get-bent-buy-a-swan-neck-chisel/ [1] 

Mine looks like this one.   Mine, a James Swan, sharpened to about 25
degrees, and definitely does not scrape, but pares. 

https://www.oldtools.co.uk/mortice-chisels/4716-clegg-swan-
neck-lock-mortice-chisel.html


Mike in Woodland 

Links:
------
[1] 
http://toolmonger.com/2007/12/10/get-bent-buy-a-swan-neck-chisel/
265999 Mike Lynd 2018‑06‑09 Re: Using a lock mortise or swans neck chisel
FWIW, my virus checke "Avast" really didn't like that link.

best wishes,

Mike Lynd
266007 Michael Suwczinsky <nicknaylo@g...> 2018‑06‑14 Re: Using a lock mortise or swans neck chisel
And much like levering out chips with pigsticker Mortising chisels
(personal gateway tool into galootish things), leave a  bit at each end of
your mortise, while your cleaning out that messy, messy bottom.

I always leaves good 3/16+ on each end, to push and pull against, and bring
it to final ‘ height’after the mortise is deep enough.

In use the swan neck I had rocked back and forth in the mortise ( in
softwood, practice joints), and would build up a fuzz on the bottom that
the pigsticker cut free.

Michael- whose woodworking of late is barely measured to the quarter inch.

On 9 June 2018 at 10:56, Michael Blair  wrote:
>
> > > So it's a scraping tool, not a chopping tool. That's probably why it's
> > cutting edge is nearly perpendicular to the end of the chisel.
> >
> > I wouldn't call it a "scraping tool."
>
-- 
Michael Suwczinsky
266011 Ed Minch <ruby1638@a...> 2018‑06‑14 Re: Every dog has his day
Nice.  Does the “Red Eye” refer to what happens when you look at the cabinet?

Ed Minch
266012 "Adrian Jones" <adrianjones747@c...> 2018‑06‑15 Re: Every dog has his day
Nice.  Does the “Red Eye” refer to what happens when you look at the cabinet?

Ed Minch

 

Yeah, I would say – I’ve added another photo that shows better.  When they
started introducing black cast iron machines into the home they had to tart them
up for the womenfolk.


 <https://photos.app.goo.g
l/3s76SJGMGX5K6n9d8> h
ttps://photos.app.goo.gl/3s76SJGMGX5K6n9d8

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
---------------------------------



Nice find on the machine.  Look forward to seeing the pictures after you
refinish the cabinet.

Roy Parker

 

What!!!  That hot pink is what sold me!

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
---------------------------------

 

  If you lived nearby, I have a naked base you could have for free.

Well come to think of it, I have a pretty plain top I would toss in on the deal
come get em! :) yours scott

 

Thanks Scott!  Yeah, I would be coming around for that base if you were nearer –
paint stripping is lifting the veneer – not sure if I can save it.  Mulling over
getting some White Oak veneer from Rocker and giving it a go.
266013 scott grandstaff <scottg@s...> 2018‑06‑15 Re: Every dog has his day
When they started introducing black cast iron machines into the home 
they had to tart them up for the womenfolk.

Singer used very thick fired enamel japanning, same as Stanley and early 
Ford.
Any color you want,........ so long as its black.
Hence,.......... decals

   This is a model 31, portable early electric, with the humpback oak 
case. I thought these were Flora Dora decals, but a girl corrected me, 
only now I can't remember the name lol
  http://users.snowcrest.net/kitty/sgrandstaff/images/house/singer31.jpg

I have restored the plain cabinets like you have (bottom of the line).
But originally ordered, it could have been this! And this is only a 
midline cabinet.
They came up to 8 drawers and very fancy carving in polished walnut. 
(oak was second grade)

Singer made more cabinet models than Stanley made block planes
  http://users.snowcrest.net/kitty/sgrandstaff/images/house/singertreadle.
jpg
yours scott

-- 
*******************************
    Scott Grandstaff
    Box 409 Happy Camp, Ca  96039
    scottg@s...
    http://www.snowcrest.n
et/kitty/sgrandstaff/
    http://www.snowcr
est.net/kitty/hpages/index.html
266014 "Adrian Jones" <adrianjones747@c...> 2018‑06‑15 Re: Every dog has his day
Scott,

Thanks for the photos - impressive woodworking.

Here is a link to an amazing film from the 1930's showing the production at
Singer's Kilbowie factory in Scotland.  It really shows the concept of
production lines and economy of scale:

http://movingimage.nls.uk/film/159
2

Cheers!

-----Original Message-----
From: OldTools [mailto:oldtools-bounces@
s...] On Behalf Of scott grandstaff
Sent: Friday, June 15, 2018 3:27 PM
To: porch
Subject: Re: [OldTools] Every dog has his day

When they started introducing black cast iron machines into the home 
they had to tart them up for the womenfolk.

Singer used very thick fired enamel japanning, same as Stanley and early 
Ford.
Any color you want,........ so long as its black.
Hence,.......... decals

   This is a model 31, portable early electric, with the humpback oak 
case. I thought these were Flora Dora decals, but a girl corrected me, 
only now I can't remember the name lol
  http://users.snowcrest.net/kitty/sgrandstaff/images/house/singer31.jpg

I have restored the plain cabinets like you have (bottom of the line).
But originally ordered, it could have been this! And this is only a 
midline cabinet.
They came up to 8 drawers and very fancy carving in polished walnut. 
(oak was second grade)

Singer made more cabinet models than Stanley made block planes
  http://users.snowcrest.net/kitty/sgrandstaff/images/house/singertreadle.
jpg
yours scott

-- 
*******************************
    Scott Grandstaff
    Box 409 Happy Camp, Ca  96039
    scottg@s...
    http://www.snowcrest.n
et/kitty/sgrandstaff/
    http://www.snowcr
est.net/kitty/hpages/index.html

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