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264123 Timm Thompson <stickcat@g...> 2017‑12‑03 My great adventure
I haven't posted for a long time. I am in the process of purchasing a cargo
van to convert to a RV. The plan is to travel around the country and fish,
camp, visit friends family and via ancestry.com follow roots around the
country. Now the question is as I travel around I plan using old tools to
create my rv interior and have a traveling workshop, what tools would you
on the porch suggest as a compact tool kit to accomplish this task? I have
some hand saws, planes, chisel, froe, maul, axes and such. I would really
value some input to help me. Roy Underhill has helped inform me, his school
in North Carolina is a destination too. Thanks for your past information.
264124 Ed Minch <ruby1638@a...> 2017‑12‑03 Re: My great adventure
Maybe a way to approach this is not “what do I need” but "how much cool stuff
can I cram in the space I am willing to devote”.  Don't forget the #1 bench
plane.


Ed Minch
264125 Claudio DeLorenzi <claudio@d...> 2017‑12‑03 Re: My great adventure
Traveling Workshop
You didn’t mention the most important tool: a bench with a vise or “work
holding appliance”.
If you don’t have much room, I’d go for one of the old Moravian style
knockdown benches that were meant to bring to the job site before the days
of 4-square milled lumber.  These typically use pegged mortise construction
and are very sturdy.  I’d definitely start with something like that, and
then add whatever type of tooling you need for the type of work planned.
If you are only going to make spoons, you’ll want different kit than if you
are making guitars.
Cheers from New York City (full of a bazillion tourists)
Claudio
264127 William Ghio <bghio@m...> 2017‑12‑03 Re: My great adventure
> On Dec 3, 2017, at 7:37 AM, Claudio DeLorenzi  wrote:
> 
> Traveling Workshop
> You didn’t mention the most important tool: a bench with a vise or “work
> holding appliance”.
> If you don’t have much room, I’d go for one of the old Moravian style
> knockdown benches that were meant to bring to the job site before the days
> of 4-square milled lumber.  These typically use pegged mortise construction
> and are very sturdy.

Roy has this portable bench in one of his early books.

h
ttps://www.flickr.com/photos/77280442@N.../albums/72157671295160514

Bill
264128 Claudio DeLorenzi <claudio@d...> 2017‑12‑03 Re: My great adventure
Moravian style bench pics :

http://contrib1.wkfinetools.com/wMyers/moravianBench/moravianBench-01.asp

Google also turns up many variations.  I really like the tusk tenon build,
and Will Meyers shows how incredibly strong these are in one of his videos
(hydraulic tester).  Worth watching.
  The build is a bit more complex because of the angles, but then you are
rewarded with a rock solid bench. I'm going to build one to use on my bit
of land near Killarney Ontario (boat access only) .  I need something I can
breakdown to a compact size so it will fit into a tiny storage shed, not to
mention small enough to transport on a small fishing boat.

Cheers from New Yawk
Claudio
264129 Josh Schulte 2017‑12‑03 Re: My great adventure
When I read your question my first thought was a workbench too. I've spent a lot
of time driving around the country living out of my truck. I know that every
inch of your space will be a very valuable. (Don't forget to save a bit of space
for some awesome finds at antique stores and flea markets along the way if you
can.)

So what about the Schawrz milkman workbench?
https:
//www.popularwoodworking.com/jun13/the-milkmans-workbench

I would think you would want a space saving toolchest too.
https://www.popularwoodworking.com
/woodworking-blogs/chris-schwarz-blog/details-on-the-dutch-tool-chests

A couple other things not to forget would be
- Small set of clamps- Sharpening kit
Happy travels!
-Josh
      From: Timm Thompson 
 To: OldTools@s... 
 Sent: Saturday, December 2, 2017 11:48 PM
 Subject: [OldTools] My great adventure
   
I haven't posted for a long time. I am in the process of purchasing a cargo
van to convert to a RV. The plan is to travel around the country and fish,
camp, visit friends family and via ancestry.com follow roots around the
country. Now the question is as I travel around I plan using old tools to
create my rv interior and have a traveling workshop, what tools would you
on the porch suggest as a compact tool kit to accomplish this task? I have
some hand saws, planes, chisel, froe, maul, axes and such. I would really
value some input to help me. Roy Underhill has helped inform me, his school
in North Carolina is a destination too. Thanks for your past information.
------------------------------------------------------------------------
OldTools is a mailing list catering to the interests of hand tool
aficionados, both collectors and users, to discuss the history, usage,
value, location, availability, collectibility, and restoration of
traditional handtools, especially woodworking tools.

To change your subscription options:
https://old
tools.swingleydev.com/mailman/listinfo/oldtools

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ve/faq.html

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ot/

OldTools@s...
264131 Don Schwartz <dks@t...> 2017‑12‑03 Re: My great adventure
On 2017-12-03 6:21 AM, William Ghio wrote:
>> On Dec 3, 2017, at 7:37 AM, Claudio DeLorenzi  wrote:
>>
>> Traveling Workshop
>> You didn’t mention the most important tool: a bench with a vise or “work
>> holding appliance”.
>> If you don’t have much room, I’d go for one of the old Moravian style
>> knockdown benches that were meant to bring to the job site before the days
>> of 4-square milled lumber.  These typically use pegged mortise construction
>> and are very sturdy.
> Roy has this portable bench in one of his early books.
>
> > https://www.flickr.com/photos/77280442@N.../albums/72157671295160514
>
> Bill

You might also consider his adaptation to Roubo featured in season 27. 
It's rising dovetail and tapered mortise construction, with a small 
thick top and a tool tray.

FWIW
Don

-- 
"You can tell a man that boozes by the company he chooses"
The Famous Pig Song, Clarke Van Ness
264132 Timm Thompson <stickcat@g...> 2017‑12‑03 Re: My great adventure
I knew I would get a lot of great responses. You have not let me down. A
workbench in one of Roy's books was a first thought but there is more to
sift through now. Hunting for rust and many other activities are on my
list. I have lots of time and projects for the construction of my van to
rv. I plan on carving about everything. I'll keep you posted.
264133 Pier-Rick Lamontagne <foutchibay@g...> 2017‑12‑03 Re: My great adventure
Wow, love the vise!
264134 bridger@b... 2017‑12‑03 Re: My great adventure
I think if I were planning such a toolkit my clamp kit would heavily
feature Spanish windlass.

----- Original Message -----
From: "Josh Schulte" 
To:"Timm Thompson" , "OldTools@s..."

Cc:
Sent:Sun, 3 Dec 2017 16:02:43 +0000 (UTC)
Subject:Re: [OldTools] My great adventure

 When I read your question my first thought was a workbench too. I've
spent a lot of time driving around the country living out of my truck.
I know that every inch of your space will be a very valuable. (Don't
forget to save a bit of space for some awesome finds at antique stores
and flea markets along the way if you can.) 

 So what about the Schawrz milkman workbench?
 https
://www.popularwoodworking.com/jun13/the-milkmans-workbench

 I would think you would want a space saving toolchest too.
 https://www.popularwoodworking.com
/woodworking-blogs/chris-schwarz-blog/details-on-the-dutch-tool-chests

 A couple other things not to forget would be
 - Small set of clamps- Sharpening kit
 Happy travels!
 -Josh
 From: Timm Thompson 
 To: OldTools@s... 
 Sent: Saturday, December 2, 2017 11:48 PM
 Subject: [OldTools] My great adventure

 I haven't posted for a long time. I am in the process of purchasing a
cargo
 van to convert to a RV. The plan is to travel around the country and
fish,
 camp, visit friends family and via ancestry.com follow roots around
the
 country. Now the question is as I travel around I plan using old
tools to
 create my rv interior and have a traveling workshop, what tools would
you
 on the porch suggest as a compact tool kit to accomplish this task? I
have
 some hand saws, planes, chisel, froe, maul, axes and such. I would
really
 value some input to help me. Roy Underhill has helped inform me, his
school
 in North Carolina is a destination too. Thanks for your past
information.
 ------------------------------------------------------------------------
 OldTools is a mailing list catering to the interests of hand tool
 aficionados, both collectors and users, to discuss the history,
usage,
 value, location, availability, collectibility, and restoration of
 traditional handtools, especially woodworking tools.

 To change your subscription options:
 https://ol
dtools.swingleydev.com/mailman/listinfo/oldtools

 To read the FAQ:
 https://swingleydev.com/arch
ive/faq.html

 OldTools archive: https://swingleydev.com
/ot/

 OldTools@s...

 ------------------------------------------------------------------------
 OldTools is a mailing list catering to the interests of hand tool
 aficionados, both collectors and users, to discuss the history,
usage,
 value, location, availability, collectibility, and restoration of
 traditional handtools, especially woodworking tools.

 To change your subscription options:
 https://ol
dtools.swingleydev.com/mailman/listinfo/oldtools

 To read the FAQ:
 https://swingleydev.com/arch
ive/faq.html

 OldTools archive: https://swingleydev.com
/ot/

 OldTools@s...
264135 Erik Levin 2017‑12‑03 Re: My great adventure
An admirable goal that I will enjoy seeing progress on. 


A tool that I have found very useful on the road (not traveling for me, just for
some of my side jobs) is a trailer hitch receiver and workholding devices that
mount into it. You have probably seen the vise on the back of a power company
truck, and the fold-down platforms for carrying an electric scooter that mount
in a receiver. The vise has been of great use to me, and I can see other
possibilities even where hand tools are involved, if for no other reason than
supporting one end of a bench with the truck makes for an effectively massive
bench with little actual weight, making it easier to move and store.
  If you have the head room, you might consider what one contractor I worked
with years ago did (he was nuts.... he fit more in a small van that I could fit
in an 18' box truck, but that is a different issue). He had most of his regular
kit in a slide out tray on long roller slides that came out the back door.
Raised the floor about 6" for a 4" deep tray. Tray came out about 4 feet (long
reach from the side to get least used things... couldn't make it from the back),
with the most used tools (hammer, saws, squares, levels, etc) near the back  for
easy access without pulling the tray all of the way out. This allowed him to fit
full sheet goods in the van without fighting. He had a few larger post-steam era
tools in a narrow rack built onto and into the side (swing) doors for easy
access and minimum obstruction. He had nearly the same cargo capacity as if the
van was bare without needing to remove normal kit. Translate cargo capacity to
living space for your plan, and you have a lot of space for planes, chisels,
squares, a full set of hollows and rounds, sharpening station, and so on. Slide
out for access and use, slide in when done. A hinged floor panel lets you get to
select items without opening the doors.


*** This message was sent from a convenience email service, and the reply
address(es) may not match the originating address
264136 galoot@l... 2017‑12‑04 Re: My great adventure
I've been seriously thinking about one as a portable take to Pennsic 
option, with an extra deep batten on one side so it folds flat.  How 
well does it deal with planing forces?

Esther

Quoting William Ghio :
264137 Derek Cohen <derekcohen@i...> 2017‑12‑04 Re: My great adventure
Timm poses the problem ..

https://s19.postimg.org/ou
ep9oypf/image.jpg

You can dovetail on it …

https://s19.postimg.org/9a
0r1ewur/image.jpg

Plane with a stop …

https://s19.postimg.org/5d
nf5f45f/image.jpg

Use the end vise …

https://s19.postimg.org/4b
d8mvdmb/image.jpg

These are the chisels I take ..

https://s19.postimg.org/me
6be31r7/image.jpg

Just add a #5 with two blades (one for smoothing/jointing and another for rough
work) and a block plane.

Have a great trip.

Regars from Perth

Derek
264138 Dwight Beebe <dwb1124@g...> 2017‑12‑04 Re: My great adventure
Derek and Galoots Assembled,

In a similar fashion, Chris Schwarz presents a portable bench that
functions like yours, Derek.  Note that he mentions first seeing one on an
Australian auction site.  Hmmm...

https:
//www.popularwoodworking.com/jun13/the-milkmans-workbench

https://www.popularwoodworking.com/workbenches
/schwarz-workbenches/the-milkmans-workbench-in-use

Looks useful.

Regards,

Dwight
264139 Darrell & Kathy <larchmont@s...> 2017‑12‑04 Re: My great adventure
On 02/12/2017 11:47 PM, Timm Thompson wrote:

> I haven't posted for a long time. I am in the process of purchasing a  > cargo
van to convert to a RV. The plan is to travel around the > country and
fish, camp, visit friends family and via ancestry.com > follow roots around the 
country. Now the question is as I travel > around I plan using old tools to 
create my rv interior and have a > traveling workshop, what tools would you on 
the porch suggest as a > compact tool kit to accomplish this task? I have some 
hand saws, > planes, chisel, froe, maul, axes and such. Tim

Sounds like you already have a good start on the tool kit.
if you're going to be doing any green woodworking you
may want a drawknife.

If you will be woodworking outdoors consider picking up
a couple of dog augers (tie-out stakes) and a ratchet strap.
I use this for my portable bench and pole lathe, to basically
tie the bench solidly to the ground.

A shaving pony to attach to your bench is a great accessory
for green woodwork.  Since you are camping I assume you
may end up using a lot of found wood or firewood so the
coarse tools like froe, hatchet and drawknife will come in
handy.


-- 
Darrell LaRue
Oakville ON
Wood Hoarder, Blade Sharpener, and Occasional Tool User
264143 Timm Thompson <stickcat@g...> 2017‑12‑04 Re: My great adventure
I really appreciate your responses. Now I have more possible directions to
follow. The trailer hitch is a great idea and where do I get on the bridge
to Perth? From time to time I will be rolling through your neighborhoods
because I will be roaming from shore shore looking for my family history.
In 2020 I am going to visit the Mayflours 400th year celebration. Turns out
my 9th Great Grandfather George Soule was on it. This is kinda discovering
the my ancestors including the 50 plus who landed between1611 and 1790. How
else to touch their memory than to experience the old ways of tools. Thanks
and Merry Christmas.
264145 Gye Greene <gyegreene@g...> 2017‑12‑04 Re: My great adventure
Timm,


Your touring sounds like a great endeavor -- and I like the thinking and
"engineering" that will go into your planning.  :)


My thoughts for a workbench were similar to Erik's (below), but with a
twist:  give your workbench two legs (with some blocks and shims, for
levelling purposes on uneven ground), and figure out a way to "lock" the
other end to the van (through the back door or side door -- such that the
stability and mass of the van contributes to the stability of the
workbench.  Maybe removable tusks or wedges, that go into a receiving
component in the wooden framework in the van?

If you had a raised platform inside the van (half a foot to a foot), you
could mount the workbench like a drawer, accessable form the back or side
of the van.  You could either have another level above this, as your "tool
drawer", or perhaps have the back end of the workbench be like a tool tray
with dividers, which holds your tools below benchtop level (which means you
could use that area as workpiece support, if needed.  Alternatively (or in
addition), have a series of small Anarchist toolchests -- small enough that
you could actually lift them! -- possibly separated not by tool type (e.g.
**not** "hammers + mallets"; "saws"; "chisels"), but rather by task (e.g.
"joinery = backsaw, chisels, trysquare").

An alternative for the benchtop (which I thought of before, when having
similar musings) is to design something like the milkman's workbench (i.e.
just a slab), but make it so that it clamps to a standard picnic table.
Have a corner bracket or "stop" on the underside of one corner, along the
length oftwo sides, to help lock it into position against the picnic table
top.  (The downside of this approach is that it requires a picnic table --
so you could only use this at parks and campgrounds.)

The "drawer" approach is inspired by the conversations that my dad did to
an old Studebaker mail truck back in the '70s, for family camping trips --
e.g.
http://findclassicars.com/uploads/carphotos/1963-studebaker-zip-
van-step-van-postal-van-mail-truck-p10-ice-cream-truck-3.JPG
, but without the funky wheels , where there was a large pull-out drawer,
accessed from the back, a sleeping platform above the drawer, and a bunk to
the right (as standing at the back of the truck).


Also to echo and expand upon Erik's thoughts:  you'll need a space of
lumber -- both what you bring with, and the nifty bits you pick up along
the way (whenever my grandfather visited Oregon  (from Seattle) he'd come
back with a trunk full of myrtlewood).


Are you going to leave behind various things you build -- kind of like a
Galooty Lone Ranger?  ("Who WAS that masked man?"  "I didn't get his name
-- but he left behind this dovetailed jewelry box.")


--Travis (Brisbane, AU)


On Mon, Dec 4, 2017 at 9:18 AM, Erik Levin via OldTools <
oldtools@s...> wrote:

> An admirable goal that I will enjoy seeing progress on.
>
>
> A tool that I have found very useful on the road (not traveling for me,
> just for some of my side jobs) is a trailer hitch receiver and workholding
> devices that mount into it. You have probably seen the vise on the back of
> a power company truck, and the fold-down platforms for carrying an electric
> scooter that mount in a receiver. The vise has been of great use to me, and
> I can see other possibilities even where hand tools are involved, if for no
> other reason than supporting one end of a bench with the truck makes for an
> effectively massive bench with little actual weight, making it easier to
> move and store.
>   If you have the head room, you might consider what one contractor I
> worked with years ago did (he was nuts.... he fit more in a small van that
> I could fit in an 18' box truck, but that is a different issue). He had
> most of his regular kit in a slide out tray on long roller slides that came
> out the back door. Raised the floor about 6" for a 4" deep tray. Tray came
> out about 4 feet (long reach from the side to get least used things...
> couldn't make it from the back), with the most used tools (hammer, saws,
> squares, levels, etc) near the back  for easy access without pulling the
> tray all of the way out.


((snipped))
264146 Gye Greene <gyegreene@g...> 2017‑12‑04 Re: My great adventure
Addendum:  Either drawer runners, or a mighty hinge -- but a tool rack that
is locked down (during travel) to the inside wall of the van - but when you
set up shop (so to speak) just outside the van door, the tool rack extends
(or swings) outwards to where you are standing.  Depending on the size of
this rack, have it be your "go to" tools (I find that I do about 98% of my
work with eight(?) tools), and the rest in the aforementioned "themed" tool
boxes.


--Travis
264147 galoot@l... 2017‑12‑04 Re: My great adventure
Quoting Darrell & Kathy :

> On 02/12/2017 11:47 PM, Timm Thompson wrote:
>
Now the question is as I travel > around I plan

> using old tools to create my rv interior and have a > traveling 
> workshop, what tools would you on the porch suggest as a > compact 
> tool kit to accomplish this task? I have some hand saws, > planes, 
> chisel, froe, maul, axes and such. Tim
>
Darrell's suggestions planed to oblivion but ask him about his 
fits-in-a-small-car-knockdown lathe....

Esther
264148 Ed Minch <ruby1638@a...> 2017‑12‑04 Re: My great adventure
Gye

What are the 8 tools?

Ed Minch
264149 <gtgrouch@r...> 2017‑12‑04 Re: My great adventure
Raises the phrase 'take it for a spin' to whole new levels of meaning!

Gary Katsanis
retreating back under his rock in Albion New York, USA
---- galoot@l... wrote: 

=============
Quoting Darrell & Kathy :

> On 02/12/2017 11:47 PM, Timm Thompson wrote:
>
Now the question is as I travel > around I plan

> using old tools to create my rv interior and have a > traveling 
> workshop, what tools would you on the porch suggest as a > compact 
> tool kit to accomplish this task? I have some hand saws, > planes, 
> chisel, froe, maul, axes and such. Tim
>
Darrell's suggestions planed to oblivion but ask him about his 
fits-in-a-small-car-knockdown lathe....

Esther

------------------------------------------------------------------------
OldTools is a mailing list catering to the interests of hand tool
aficionados, both collectors and users, to discuss the history, usage,
value, location, availability, collectibility, and restoration of
traditional handtools, especially woodworking tools.

To change your subscription options:
https://old
tools.swingleydev.com/mailman/listinfo/oldtools

To read the FAQ:
https://swingleydev.com/archi
ve/faq.html

OldTools archive: https://swingleydev.com/
ot/

OldTools@s...
264151 David Nighswander <wishingstarfarm663@m...> 2017‑12‑05 Re: My great adventure
What a great idea. Adventure while you are able to enjoy it.
In addition to your list:
Single bevel hatchet. It will in time cut down a tree, limb it, square it, and
cut a tenon on the end. Makes kindling for the campfire from the offcuts. Single
bevel will do everything a camping hatchet will do and more.
3/8" and 3/4" paring chisel. You will want a mortise eventually.
Consider fasteners needed/used and build a toolset to accomodate. Brace, bits,
eggbeater, twist drills to fit. Glue and needed accessories.
A set of Scott Grandstaff mini bench/sawtables if you are traditional. A
WorkMate if you're not.
A scraper.
A good Sloyd knife. A locking blade pocket knife will pass for the Sloyd.
4 in one rasp. It will work for most things.
Files for your saws.
Sharpening method. (Insert tools of choice)

Duck tape. It will get you back to civilization and make you popular with your
friends who didn't plan.

Nice but not necessary:
Turning saw with extra blades. It will disassemble into a small package and will
take the place of most other saws.

55 years of camping says, non traditional but good to have. The best rescue is
not needing one.
A good receiver mounted, minimum 5000 lb, winch with receiver mounts front and
rear. It rides outside. Doesn't weigh a lot. With a snatch block it will pick up
the front or rear of the vehicle.
You will get stuck.
50 feet of 10,000 lb breaking strength line. Trees are never where you want
them.
If you haven't already planned for it a 12 volt tester. The little digital jobs
work but make sure you understand it.
A battery booster. Walking to a place where you can charge a dead battery sucks.
Batteries are heavy. Cell phones go dead too.
A plastic box tool set for the vehicle. Sockets, wrenches, hex keys, screw
drivers. Multi tools will drive you nuts working under a dashboard.
A fan belt. It happens.
Two spare tires mounted outside.
A kit of tire plugs.
5 ton bottle jack.
Folding trenching tool.

Not needed unless you are like me and go there just to see.
Tire chains.

Recent Search Bios FAQ