OldTools Archive

Recent Search Bios FAQ

150390 GHS <GHS@e...> 2005‑09‑28 Problems with the mailman program.
1.Digests have been set to individual mail
2 The url for options does not work yet, so we can not fix #1 ourselves. 
Has anyone had luck with the "command emails"?
3. Admin  setting for where to return reply to is set to sender I 
believe. Is that intentional? Normally those get set to "list" I believe.

Mike Graf

-- 
Please visit us at http://www.gaudeteforge.com/

------------------------------------------------------------------------
OldTools is a mailing list catering to the interests of hand tool
aficionados, both collectors and users, to discuss the history, usage,
value, location, availability, collectibility, and restoration of
traditional handtools, especially woodworking tools.

To read the FAQ:
http://www.frontier.iarc.uaf.edu/~cswingle/archive/faq.html

OldTools archive: http://www.frontier.iarc.uaf.edu/~cswingle/archive/

OldTools@r...
http://ruckus.law.cornell.edu/mailman/listinfo/oldtools


247903 "David Erickson" <dave@r...> 2014‑05‑16 RE: The Sole of an Old Beech Jointer
Also, not to belabor the point, but the examples I have seen so far in this
thread of patches, were patches to the sole.  My “less traditional” alternative
was a steel wedge attached inside the throat.  i.e. a vertical wedge screwed in
the throat mortise that closes it to the desired gap.

 

From: David Erickson [mailto:dave@r...] 
Sent: Friday, May 16, 2014 10:21 AM
To: 'Zachary Dillinger'; 'Adam R. Maxwell'
Cc: 'John Holladay'; 'oldtools@r...'
Subject: RE: [OldTools] The Sole of an Old Beech Jointer

 

I’ve seen many resoled planes, often with lignum vitae or ebony.  As to whether
they were old or new resole jobs, couldn’t comment, didn’t look.

 

From: Zachary Dillinger [mailto:zacharydillinger@g...]
Sent: Friday, May 16, 2014 10:09 AM
To: Adam R. Maxwell
Cc: John Holladay; oldtools@r...; David Erickson
Subject: Re: [OldTools] The Sole of an Old Beech Jointer

 

Exactly. I've seen many old patches on wooden planes but I've never seen an old
resole job.




--
Zachary Dillinger

http://eatoncountywoodworke
r.blogspot.com/

The Eaton County Joinery
www.theeatoncountyjoinery.com <http://www.theeatoncountyjoinery.com>
517-231-3374

 

On Fri, May 16, 2014 at 1:06 PM, Adam R. Maxwell mailto:amaxwell@m...> > wrote:

I'm with you on patching the mouth! I'm also curious why the OP thinks a resole
is more traditional? I mean, it's a plane, not a boot… :)

Adam


> On May 16, 2014, at 10:02, Zachary Dillinger mailto:zacharydillinger@g...> > wrote:
>
> Well, I appear to be in the minority, preferring to patch the mouth. Either
> way will work beautifully if you are careful
247906 "Adam R. Maxwell" <amaxwell@m...> 2014‑05‑16 Re: The Sole of an Old Beech Jointer
You're right, I read that as a wedge-shaped piece attached to the sole in the
mouth.

Throat closing wedges (of wood) are more common for low angle planes, I think,
because they have more room for chip clearing. Doesn't mean that it wouldn't
work, of course, but what would keep it from acting as a scraper as the sole
wears?

> On May 16, 2014, at 10:28, David Erickson  wrote:
> 
> Also, not to belabor the point, but the examples I have seen so far in this
thread of patches, were patches to the sole.  My “less traditional” alternative
was a steel wedge attached inside the throat.  i.e. a vertical wedge screwed in
the throat mortise that closes it to the desired gap.
>  
> From: David Erickson [mailto:dave@r...] 
> Sent: Friday, May 16, 2014 10:21 AM
> To: 'Zachary Dillinger'; 'Adam R. Maxwell'
> Cc: 'John Holladay'; 'oldtools@r...'
> Subject: RE: [OldTools] The Sole of an Old Beech Jointer
>  
> I’ve seen many resoled planes, often with lignum vitae or ebony.  As to
whether they were old or new resole jobs, couldn’t comment, didn’t look.
>  
> From: Zachary Dillinger [mailto:zacharydillinger@g...]
> Sent: Friday, May 16, 2014 10:09 AM
> To: Adam R. Maxwell
> Cc: John Holladay; oldtools@r...; David Erickson
> Subject: Re: [OldTools] The Sole of an Old Beech Jointer
>  
> Exactly. I've seen many old patches on wooden planes but I've never seen an
old resole job.
> 
> --
> Zachary Dillinger
> http://eatoncountywoodwor
ker.blogspot.com/
> The Eaton County Joinery
> www.theeatoncountyjoinery.com
> 517-231-3374
>  
> 
> On Fri, May 16, 2014 at 1:06 PM, Adam R. Maxwell  wrote:
> I'm with you on patching the mouth! I'm also curious why the OP thinks a
resole is more traditional? I mean, it's a plane, not a boot… :)
> 
> Adam
> 
> > On May 16, 2014, at 10:02, Zachary Dillinger  wrote:
> >
> > Well, I appear to be in the minority, preferring to patch the mouth. Either
> > way will work beautifully if you are careful
>
247908 "David Erickson" <dave@r...> 2014‑05‑16 RE: The Sole of an Old Beech Jointer
Good question, the steel wedge would be removed and filed if adjustment was
needed.  Also the wedge would be relieved at the front edge so contact would be
at the rear.

 

From: Adam R. Maxwell [mailto:amaxwell@m...]
Sent: Friday, May 16, 2014 10:34 AM
To: David Erickson
Cc: Zachary Dillinger; John Holladay; oldtools@r...
Subject: Re: [OldTools] The Sole of an Old Beech Jointer

 

You're right, I read that as a wedge-shaped piece attached to the sole in the
mouth.

 

Throat closing wedges (of wood) are more common for low angle planes, I think,
because they have more room for chip clearing. Doesn't mean that it wouldn't
work, of course, but what would keep it from acting as a scraper as the sole
wears?


On May 16, 2014, at 10:28, David Erickson mailto:dave@r...> > wrote:

Also, not to belabor the point, but the examples I have seen so far in this
thread of patches, were patches to the sole.  My “less traditional” alternative
was a steel wedge attached inside the throat.  i.e. a vertical wedge screwed in
the throat mortise that closes it to the desired gap.

 

From: David Erickson [mailto:dave@r...] 
Sent: Friday, May 16, 2014 10:21 AM
To: 'Zachary Dillinger'; 'Adam R. Maxwell'
Cc: 'John Holladay'; 'oldtools@r... <mailto:oldtools@r...> '
Subject: RE: [OldTools] The Sole of an Old Beech Jointer

 

I’ve seen many resoled planes, often with lignum vitae or ebony.  As to whether
they were old or new resole jobs, couldn’t comment, didn’t look.

 

From: Zachary Dillinger [mailto:zacharydillinger@g...]
Sent: Friday, May 16, 2014 10:09 AM
To: Adam R. Maxwell
Cc: John Holladay; oldtools@r... <mailto:oldtools@r...> ; David Erickson
Subject: Re: [OldTools] The Sole of an Old Beech Jointer

 

Exactly. I've seen many old patches on wooden planes but I've never seen an old
resole job.




--
Zachary Dillinger

http://eatoncountywoodworke
r.blogspot.com/

The Eaton County Joinery
www.theeatoncountyjoinery.com <http://www.theeatoncountyjoinery.com>
517-231-3374

 

On Fri, May 16, 2014 at 1:06 PM, Adam R. Maxwell mailto:amaxwell@m...> > wrote:

I'm with you on patching the mouth! I'm also curious why the OP thinks a resole
is more traditional? I mean, it's a plane, not a boot… :)

Adam


> On May 16, 2014, at 10:02, Zachary Dillinger mailto:zacharydillinger@g...> > wrote:
>
> Well, I appear to be in the minority, preferring to patch the mouth. Either
> way will work beautifully if you are careful
248338 Thomas Conroy <booktoolcutter@y...> 2014‑06‑04 RE: incannel
John Ruth wrote: "Scott's comment about mounted stones brings up the question as
to whether a
CONICAL mounted stone of the correct diameter and taper might not sharpen an
incannel gouge perfectly in a single contact with the stone."


I've eaten up a number of conical mounted stones for cleaning up the insides of
mushroomed chisel sockets, though I have to confess I've usually bought them
new. In my experience, if a power grinder is the same diameter as the curve I am
trying to make, it grabs and tries to throw the tool off somewhere. So far I've
been lucky and it hasn't thrown it at me. So now, I always grind with a tool of
smaller diameter than the surface I am trying to make; with a conical stone,
with a part of the cone that is smaller.

Tom
248340 Phil Schempf <philschempf@g...> 2014‑06‑04 Re: RE: incannel
I imagine Jim will be along shortly to set us straight, but in the mean
time you can look at his article on sharpening incannels on Wictor's site-

http://www.wkfinetools.com/contrib/jThompson/incannelGouge/incanGauge1.asp<
/a>

Phil


On Wed, Jun 4, 2014 at 12:04 PM, Thomas Conroy 
wrote:

> John Ruth wrote: "Scott's comment about mounted stones brings up the
> question as to whether a
> CONICAL mounted stone of the correct diameter and taper might not sharpen
> an
> incannel gouge perfectly in a single contact with the stone."
>
>
> I've eaten up a number of conical mounted stones for cleaning up the
> insides of mushroomed chisel sockets, though I have to confess I've usually
> bought them new. In my experience, if a power grinder is the same diameter
> as the curve I am trying to make, it grabs and tries to throw the tool off
> somewhere. So far I've been lucky and it hasn't thrown it at me. So now, I
> always grind with a tool of smaller diameter than the surface I am trying
> to make; with a conical stone, with a part of the cone that is smaller.
>
> Tom
>
> ------------------------------------------------------------------------
> OldTools is a mailing list catering to the interests of hand tool
> aficionados, both collectors and users, to discuss the history, usage,
> value, location, availability, collectibility, and restoration of
> traditional handtools, especially woodworking tools.
>
> To change your subscription options:
> http://rucku
s.law.cornell.edu/mailman/listinfo/oldtools
>
> To read the FAQ:
> http://swingleydev.com/archi
ve/faq.html
>
> OldTools archive: http://swingleydev.com/archive/
>
> OldTools@r...
> http://rucku
s.law.cornell.edu/mailman/listinfo/oldtools
>
248342 David Nighswander <wishingstarfarm663@m...> 2014‑06‑05 Re: incannel
>From: Adrian Jones




>As for sharpening, could you make some lengths of wood the exact profile and
>glue on various grits of sandpaper?

Your question triggered a memory. 
In ancient times early Galoots used a very convoluted process to create such a
tool.
The long drawn out explanation is here: 
http://books.google.com/books?id=v98DAAAAMBAJ&pg=PA330&dq=m
ake+emery+wheels&hl=en&sa=X&ei=V86PU8zfHIGYyASqzIKoBw&ved=0CEAQ6AEwAA#v=onepage&
q=make%20emery%20wheels&f=false
248343 "Cliff Rohrabacher, Esq" <rohrabacher@e...> 2014‑06‑05 Re: Was incanel now Thermite and RR tracks
Somewhere in that pop mechanics edition is a segment on Thermite welding 
of RR tracks
Reference back to a conversation on this a while back.

On 6/4/2014 10:03 PM, David Nighswander wrote:
>> From: Adrian Jones
>
>
>
>> As for sharpening, could you make some lengths of wood the exact profile and
>> glue on various grits of sandpaper?
> Your question triggered a memory.
> In ancient times early Galoots used a very convoluted process to create such a
tool.
> The long drawn out explanation is here:
> http://books.google.com/books?id=v98DAAAAMBAJ&pg=PA330&dq
=make+emery+wheels&hl=en&sa=X&ei=V86PU8zfHIGYyASqzIKoBw&ved=0CEAQ6AEwAA#v=onepag
e&q=make%20emery%20wheels&f=false
>
>
> ------------------------------------------------------------------------
> OldTools is a mailing list catering to the interests of hand tool
> aficionados, both collectors and users, to discuss the history, usage,
> value, location, availability, collectibility, and restoration of
> traditional handtools, especially woodworking tools.
>
> To change your subscription options:
> http://rucku
s.law.cornell.edu/mailman/listinfo/oldtools
>
> To read the FAQ:
> http://swingleydev.com/archi
ve/faq.html
>
> OldTools archive: http://swingleydev.com/archive/
>
> OldTools@r...
> http://rucku
s.law.cornell.edu/mailman/listinfo/oldtools
248345 Ed Minch <ruby@m...> 2014‑06‑05 Re: incannel
fascinating - I suppose you can re-apply the emory to the base over and over
again once you have that base,

I was most impressed by the “Woven metal costume for electricians”.

Ed Minch





On Jun 4, 2014, at 10:03 PM, David Nighswander  wrote:

> 
> Your question triggered a memory. 
> In ancient times early Galoots used a very convoluted process to create such a
tool.
> The long drawn out explanation is here: 
> http://books.google.com/books?id=v98DAAAAMBAJ&pg=PA330&dq=make+em
ery+wheels&hl=en&sa=X&ei=V86PU8zfHIGYyASqzIKoBw&ved=0CEAQ6AEwAA#v=onepage&q=make
%20emery%20wheels&f=false-------------------------------------------------------
-----------------
248354 David Nighswander <wishingstarfarm663@m...> 2014‑06‑06 Re: incannel
From: Ed Minch





fascinating - I suppose you can re-apply the emory to the base over and over
again once you have that base,​



I was most impressed by the “Woven metal costume for electricians”.




http://books.google.com/books?id=v98DAAAAMBAJ&pg=PA330&dq=m
ake+emery+wheels&hl=en&sa=X&ei=V86PU8zfHIGYyASqzIKoBw&ved=0CEAQ6AEwAA#v=onepage&
q=make%20emery%20wheels&f=false



The suit is a cool idea. A Faraday cage costume is one way to prevent being
electrocuted. As long as the suit is grounded any charge will travel through the
metal mesh to ground without putting the wearer in the circuit.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki
/Faraday_cage

Not that I want to put myself at risk by pulling a stunt like that.
249402 Thomas Conroy <booktoolcutter@y...> 2014‑07‑22 Re: Making Railroad Ties
Jim Crammond wrote: "Chopping a Railroad Tie out of an 8 foot log �paid �10
cents per tie.A good �Tie Hacker could �earn 80 cents a day ...for 8 ties."

They cost more than that now.


http://woodknot.com/public/index.cfm?fuseaction=Home&TheMenuItem=Home


Tom Conroy
ducking and running
263311 Don Schwartz <dks@t...> 2017‑09‑16 Re: re spar varnish sound off....
On 2017-09-15 6:56 PM, ecoyle@t... wrote:
> the local boat repairer recommended “epifanes”
>
> anyway site is
> > https://www.epifanes.
com/page/clear-finishes
>
> a tad on the pricy side, but I’ve done wooden  vanity countertops that did not
take kindly to the water
>
> for sink cut-outs, you want to make sure that the cuts are sealed too, and
that silicone sealant is meticulously applied., or you will be responding to
your own “call-backs”
>
> Used it a while back to  refinish exterior church doors....If I recall
correctly thinners/sovents are equally pricey

I used epifanes to varnish east &  south-facing window frames a few 
years ago - MLW says 8-9 years! Six coats, starting thin & getting 
thicker each time. Probably should have sanded some and revarnished 
sooner, but round to-its have been scarce around here the past while. 
Anyway, those areas which get the most sun - the sills especially, and 
lower half of the frames - have deteriorated. Those areas need scraping 
and refinishing. But the upper portions, which get much less sun, still 
look good. I'll sand those areas lightly and recoat, if the weather 
breaks sometime soon. Good stuff. Pricey though. Thinners pricey too.

FWIW

Don

-- 
"You can tell a man that boozes by the company he chooses"
The Famous Pig Song, Clarke Van Ness
263313 gary may 2017‑09‑16 Re: re spar varnish sound off....
Don and Gentle Galoots---

    Varnish for windows---there's an epiphany for me. GOT to be beautiful...
    I use that Epifanes spar varnish too, and I love it on furniture. I used to
use the local spar from Miller Paint, but they quit making 'real' varnish long
ago (and not so long ago, all 'oil' paints)...sad days for me.  I love that
stuff.
   .A commercial boat-builder friend of told me that ALL varnish is expensive,
in terms of time spent putting it on and restoring it, so Epifanes is the best
bargain, being the toughest natural finish in his experience.  It's pretty
tough, all right.
    I haven't used it outdoors for anything, but it is designed to be out there,
in the salt and direct sun, and made to endure tremendous beating and abrasion
too. I'm getting ready to make a bay window to overlook our frog pond in the
backyard, and I'll varnish that---it'll be under the eaves, and won't see much
direct sun so it'll surely outlast my ass.
    btw, I use regular paint thinner or turpentine---also at the recommendation
of my boat-builder buddy--works fine for me.  I have benches and table tops that
look as good as they did when the varnish cured. And in some cases, that's 30+
years, though that'd be Miller's brew.....
thanks Don, and best to all galoots everywhere---gam in OlyWa/USA

How horrible it is to have so many people killed!---And what a blessing one
cares for none of them!
Jane Austen

      From: Don Schwartz 
 To: oldtools@s... 
 Sent: Friday, September 15, 2017 7:09 PM
 Subject: Re: [OldTools] re spar varnish sound off....
   
On 2017-09-15 6:56 PM, ecoyle@t... wrote:
> the local boat repairer recommended “epifanes”
>
> anyway site is
> > https://www.epifanes.
com/page/clear-finishes
>
> a tad on the pricy side, but I’ve done wooden  vanity countertops that did not
take kindly to the water
>
> for sink cut-outs, you want to make sure that the cuts are sealed too, and
that silicone sealant is meticulously applied., or you will be responding to
your own “call-backs”
>
> Used it a while back to  refinish exterior church doors....If I recall
correctly thinners/sovents are equally pricey

I used epifanes to varnish east &  south-facing window frames a few 
years ago - MLW says 8-9 years! Six coats, starting thin & getting 
thicker each time. Probably should have sanded some and revarnished 
sooner, but round to-its have been scarce around here the past while. 
Anyway, those areas which get the most sun - the sills especially, and 
lower half of the frames - have deteriorated. Those areas need scraping 
and refinishing. But the upper portions, which get much less sun, still 
look good. I'll sand those areas lightly and recoat, if the weather 
breaks sometime soon. Good stuff. Pricey though. Thinners pricey too.

FWIW

Don

-- 
"You can tell a man that boozes by the company he chooses"
The Famous Pig Song, Clarke Van Ness

------------------------------------------------------------------------
OldTools is a mailing list catering to the interests of hand tool
aficionados, both collectors and users, to discuss the history, usage,
value, location, availability, collectibility, and restoration of
traditional handtools, especially woodworking tools.

To change your subscription options:
https://old
tools.swingleydev.com/mailman/listinfo/oldtools

To read the FAQ:
https://swingleydev.com/archi
ve/faq.html

OldTools archive: https://swingleydev.com/
ot/

OldTools@s...
263314 Ed Minch <ruby1638@a...> 2017‑09‑16 Re: re spar varnish sound off....
I have a friend who is a professional finisher, and she will take on a boat once
in a while.  Her finishes are like mirrors.  IIRC her first coat is 50/50 of
Intelux Schooner varnish and mineral spirits, then 2 coats full strength, then a
light sand to get rid of goobers, then 2 coats with a splash of Penetrol in it.
Not a brush stroke in site.  Always high gloss- ‘cause it’s a boat!

Another friend had a 72 foot William Hand designed motor sailor that he restored
in the late 70’s and cruised the Carribean and East Coast and sold in after
about 2000. He renamed it the William Hand because it was so typical of the
designer’s work.  Here it is for sale after another restoration:

http://www.yachtworld.com/boats/1933/William-Hand-
motorsailer-2685698/South-Freeport/ME/United-States#.Wb1_5hTtFEc

Our boat takes 1 quart of varnish per session for one coat on the mast and two
on the deck trim.  His boat took 70 quarts for 3 coats (that’s 18 gallons) and
he put it on with a roller.

Ed Minch
263317 Chuck Taylor 2017‑09‑17 Re: re spar varnish sound off....
Gentle Galoots,

One point about spar varnishes that may get overlooked:  Spar varnishes intended
for marine applications contain UV inhibitors to protect the finish against
ultraviolet light. The UV inhibitors "wear out" with exposure to sunlight.
That's why new varnish needs to be applied on a regular basis (to replace the UV
inhibitors). In the Puget Sound region, I get away with 2 coats every 2 years (I
keep my boat under cover when not in use). In Florida I'm told they need to
refresh varnish on boats every 6 months. Once a year is enough in most places.
YMMV.

For non-marine use it depends on how much sun exposure there is.

Chuck Taylor
north of Seattle
where we are getting some much-needed rain after a long, dry summer
263371 Don Schwartz <dks@t...> 2017‑09‑23 Re: Difficult project fluting
On 2017-09-22 7:40 PM, Joseph Sullivan wrote:
> how does one turn an elliptical shape?


This is not a trivial problem, and may be well-documented somewhere. I 
believe you need to use multiple centers (for off-centre turning), but 
how you calculate the spacing of the centers to produce the desired 
ellipse is beyond my comprehension. Suggest you search printed sources 
and youtube for 'woodturning ellipse' for ideas. There are eccentric 
chucks and apparently also an ellipse chuck, but there may be other 
ideas that will inspire you. It's been done before - you just have to 
research til you find a solution or reinvent the wheel. Have fun!

As for the fluting, a pair of dividers, a flexible rule and a few 
carving gouges should be all you need - assuming you already have the 
patience and steady hands!

Don

-- 
"You can tell a man that boozes by the company he chooses"
The Famous Pig Song, Clarke Van Ness
263393 Don Schwartz <dks@t...> 2017‑09‑30 Re: Miller's Falls 120b handle?
On 2017-09-29 7:12 PM, Bill Traynor wrote:
> Hello,
>
> Anyone know where I might obtain a side handle for a Miller's Falls 
> 120B breast drill? 

Somewhere on this planet there is a mountain of egg beater and breast 
drill side handles - like the floating plastic island out in the Pacific.

Don

-- 
"You can tell a man that boozes by the company he chooses"
The Famous Pig Song, Clarke Van Ness
263395 John Ruth <johnrruth@h...> 2017‑09‑30 Re: Miller's Falls 120b handle?
Don and The Porch

Right next to the mountain of breast drill handles is a smaller mountain of lost
breast plates.

There's a foothill of missing chuck jaws.

To paraphrase Michael Dunbar, any inexpensive useful looking antique took parts
should be bought on sight. If you don't use them, they can be eBay'ed or taken
to a swap meet.

John Ruth
Off to a flea market!


Se
263396 Ed Minch <ruby1638@a...> 2017‑09‑30 Re: Miller's Falls 120b handle?
They live on the planet of lost socks

Ed Minch
263533 Don Schwartz <dks@t...> 2017‑10‑13 Re: best way to bind a stump
On 2017-10-13 8:49 AM, Joseph Sullivan wrote:
> Friends:
>
> The Bois d'Arc stump on which I rest my anvil has split.  It is about 18
inches in diameter.  What is the best way to solidly and permanently bind it
together?
>
> Joe
>
> Joseph Sullivan
>
Along with all the other great suggestions, you might have a dispensing 
tin or two of flexible metal strapping which come with their own 
hollow-rectangular clips and a little ratcheting strap wrench for 
tightening. Can't recall what the stuff is called (and I'm 2 days 
driving from home), but they are quite strong and useful for containing 
irregular shapes. A kind of old-school zip tie!

Don

-- 
Friday the 13th is just a dumb superstition. At least that’s what my horoscope
said.
– Matt Nedostup

"You can tell a man that boozes by the company he chooses"
The Famous Pig Song, Clarke Van Ness
263715 Don Schwartz <dks@t...> 2017‑10‑28 Re: Patina?
On 2017-10-27 4:33 PM, Mike Lynd via OldTools wrote:
> And the correct pronunciation is.........
>
> p'TEENǝ
>
> or
>
> PATinnǝ?


The Wiktionary suggests the two illustrate yet another difference 
between English as spoken in Britain and as it's spoken in USA. In 
Britain, the emphasis is apparently on the first syllable, whereas in 
America it's on the second. The latter is arguably closer to the French 
'patine' , from which it is derived (or so they say), though the 'hard' 
EE sound would not be. In my experience here in Canada, English speakers 
favour the American emphasis. As an aside, it appears the default 
spell-checker in Thunderbird is American-based: it highlights my 
spelling of 'favour'. I'll have to fix that!


FWIW

Don

-- 
"You can tell a man that boozes by the company he chooses"
The Famous Pig Song, Clarke Van Ness
263722 Thomas Conroy 2017‑10‑30 Re: Patina?
Mike Lynd wrote: "I always thought that the second one was the correct one with
the emphasis
on the first syllable, but I hear the first one more and more these days. I
await the decision of the Porch."

This is the magic of the word "patina." There are at least three pronunciations
(paTEENa, paTYNEa, PATinna), and by appropriate choice you can generally make
yourself sound snooty and your customer (excuse me, "client") feel like an
undereducated boor. This is in preparation for charging at least five times
going rate for an object (excuse me, "objet.") On the other hand, by matching
the pronunciation of a more sophisticated client you can encourage feelings of
collegiality and lure him into thinking you are on the same side, making it
easier to slip him a piece that is, well, "sophisticated" in the rare book
meaning (a polite euphemism for "faked up a bit", Jeff). And since the word
means, objectively, just "old surface" it can be used to describe anything form
the smooth, beautiful surface left by wear and the rubbing of the hand on
natural stable oxidation, through deliberate new oxidation for the sake of
brilliant colors, to a disgusting grotty old coating of soil, corrosion, and
filth. The word "patina" is in fact a pretty good hype alert, not a diagnostic
all by itself but a warning to be on your toes.
Tom Conroy
harrumphing and schwaless, a day or two late.
263723 Don Schwartz <dks@t...> 2017‑10‑30 Re: Stratton Brothers Level
On 2017-10-29 4:45 PM, Brent A Kinsey wrote:
> I suppose it is possible that the vial became broken at some point and the
prior owner meticulously cleaned out the vee notch and pared away any trace of
plaster, although I think this unlikely.


Brent:

Perhaps a prior owner cleaned out the plaster etc , intending to insert 
a new vial, as you intend, but for some reason failed to do so. Death, 
incapacity etc sometimes intervene. I have wondered what MLW would do 
should she have to deal with the bits & bobs of my projects in progress. 
I rather doubt she would seek out missing parts.. .


FWIW

Don

-- 
"You can tell a man that boozes by the company he chooses"
The Famous Pig Song, Clarke Van Ness
263754 Don Schwartz <dks@t...> 2017‑11‑02 Re: Free old box knife w/out retractable blade
On 2017-11-02 5:56 AM, Gye Greene wrote:
> I have enough tools from him (including both of my saw sets), and the
> non-retractable blade scares me.;)

I fit mine into a length of suitably-sized heavy cardboard tubing. I 
find that stuff very useful, especially when working outside of the 
shop. Great for knives, pad saw, drywall saw, ice pick, etc. - and cheap!

FWIW
Don

-- 
"You can tell a man that boozes by the company he chooses"
The Famous Pig Song, Clarke Van Ness
263771 Don Schwartz <dks@t...> 2017‑11‑02 Re: New galoot
On 2017-11-02 3:07 PM, Mick Dowling wrote:
> Welcome aboard. There are quite a few British, and Australians on the list,
> some New Zealanders also, best you only take advice from us to help you out
> with English.
>
> Mick Dowling
> Melbourne


Ahem. Canadians first! You'll have a chance understanding us.

Don, in Calgary, where winter is setting in...

-- 
"You can tell a man that boozes by the company he chooses"
The Famous Pig Song, Clarke Van Ness
263773 Don Schwartz <dks@t...> 2017‑11‑02 Re: New galoot
On 2017-11-02 4:25 PM, bridger@b... wrote:
> you can run, but you can't hide.

In the outback, he could hide forever...

Don

-- 
"You can tell a man that boozes by the company he chooses"
The Famous Pig Song, Clarke Van Ness
263778 "yorkshireman@y..." <yorkshireman@y...> 2017‑11‑03 Re: New galoot
Excuse me, but,

The first order of business is to say ‘Welcome' to Rick, evidently someone of
refinement and good taste,  for whom a rocking chair is ready over here on the
quality end of the porch, overlooking the river.  Cool refreshing throat
lubrication is ever available from our perpetually renewed stocks of anything at
all, and the conversation covers everything but religion and politics in flowing
and erudite terms.

Secondly.. 
You may have noted some of our colonial friends chattering 
> Sorry about the long presentation and i'm very glad that I found you guys
> !!
> 
> P.S. Sorry about my english, My native language is french, don't hesitate
> to correct me if you see mistakes, I want to write english better :)
> 
> Rick.

There - you said it.  You want to write english better.  The clue is in the
name,  English.  From England. From whence so much civilisation spread across
the world - after we had slaughtered any inhabitants, of course.  The only place
for good advice oin the matter is from this side of the Atlantic.
You can tell we’re more sophisticated than what our colonial cousins are,
because no one had the good grace to mention that, unlike French, the verb comes
first - so “I want to write English better”   would be “I want to write better
English”
Now, given that our English court had French as the official language after we
were invaded, I have no idea why we did that, perhaps the many traps we have in
English is just so we can tell when someone ‘isn’t from round here’
Not that I care, I’m fro’ Yorkshire, so most of my language is a hangover from
the Viking invaders, with a bit of Scots here and there, and some Anglo-Saxon.

But, whatever the language, the sentiment is the same -  You’re welcome here.  
Incidentally, I once sent a galootaclaus victim some beer and elephant dung.
Its not the value that matters.
oh, for the avoidance of doubt, the dung came with seed for a hardwood -
(perfect growing medium)  and the bottle of fine english beer was to while away
the time whilst waiting for your timber to grow. The beer would have been “Old
Peculiar” probably, as the name suits us - and it’s a fine beer on draught,
especially at the ‘Red Lion’ on Blakey Ridge.

Richard Wilson
Yorkshireman Galoot
in Northumbria

- and of course, we all have a common code of speech here anyway, made of
numbers, tooth counts, grit sizes, and friendly banter.
263782 Gye Greene <gyegreene@g...> 2017‑11‑03 Re: Free old box knife w/out retractable blade
Kirk, Don, and others:  good points about tool organization.

Partly this is just my tiny way of sending tools I ain't never gonna use
back into the wild.  ;)


I also have about eight near-identical backsaws -- and about eight very
similar TPI crosscut saws -- that I probably need to sort through and give
away about half, if not more.

The hammers, however, totally stay.

This --
https://4.bp.blogspot.com/-Y0YtyQRaE-s/UePtEG50OeI/AAAAAAAA
BeY/tnBZcXJSDS4/s1600/hamrs.JPG
--  is about half of my stash of hammers:  I found another stash of them
after I took the photo, and couldn't be bothered to re-shoot.  And that
tally excludes about six mallets, which I claim to be distinct from
"hammers".   (More hammers than some Galoots; fewer than others.)


--Travis
263859 Don Schwartz <dks@t...> 2017‑11‑12 Re: website tool descriptions
On 2017-11-11 7:54 PM, Derek Cohen wrote:
> Don asked
>
> 
> Yes it is you:)
>
> The blade is skewed. Not a lot, tho’. Look at the sides of the blade
(different pics) - one side is wider than the other. Look at the sole/mouth
carefully. The angle from which the picture was taken reduces the skew, but it
is there. Zoom in. You will see it.
>
> Regards from Perth
>
> Derek
>
> https://www.jimbodetools.com/collections/whats-new/products/rare-skewed-
norris-no-18-shoulder-plane-77016u  <https://www.jimbodetools.com/collections
/whats-new/products/rare-skewed-norris-no-18-shoulder-plane-77016u>
>
Way too subtle for me. Looking at the pic of the sole with the image 
zoomed, it seems to me that the edges of the mouth are parallel to the 
trailing edge of the sole. That says to me there's no skewing.

FWIW

Don

-- 
"You can tell a man that boozes by the company he chooses"
The Famous Pig Song, Clarke Van Ness
263860 Ed Minch <ruby1638@a...> 2017‑11‑12 Re: website tool descriptions
What he said.  Skewing is usually in the 20-25° range and if this is skewed it
is only a couple of degrees.

Ed Minch
263861 Claudio DeLorenzi <claudio@d...> 2017‑11‑12 Re: website tool descriptions
Yeah, what would be the purpose of a 3 degree skew?  I don’t think this
plane satisfies the usual definition of what I would consider a skew
plane.  I think this was simply an error.
Cheers from Frigid Montréal (on the last morning of the conference)
Claudio
263877 Joshua Clark <jclark@h...> 2017‑11‑12 Re: website tool descriptions
Did anyone try to ask Jim? I'm sure he would tell you if it's skewed
or if they description is in error.

Josh
263884 Peter McBride <peter_mcbride@b...> 2017‑11‑12 Re: website tool descriptions
I've about half a dozen skew mouth rebate shoulder type planes, and one of the
hardest things to do is get a picture that shows the skew, other than taking the
pic directly Square to the base. One lovely little skew Mathieson came to me
because "even I" thought it was straight from all the pics on evilbay. I wanted
it for the tiny size...On opening it up I saw the blade packed separate and
thought what dummy sharpened that!!
Cheers,
Peter
263889 Don Schwartz <dks@t...> 2017‑11‑12 Re: Ozone and musty antique furniture
On 2017-11-12 12:40 PM, Michael Parrish wrote:
> I have a few antique wooden furniture items, including a 80-100 year old
thread cabinet that I inherited from my dear grandmother.  They've unfortunately
been living in my garage for the last year because I have a musty odor that I
can't seem to get rid of. Strictly

Not sure this will work, but it would be cheap and easy to try. Remove 
the cabinet from the garage. Fill the cabinet drawers with dry, loosely 
crumpled clean newspaper. Give it some time, then replace the newspaper. 
If this brings little joy, build a plastic tent around the cabinet, and 
put saucers of baking soda in the drawers and under the cabinet. 
Maximize the surface area of the baking soda exposed to the air. Replace 
baking soda after a week or so. If that doesn't do it, try to get your 
hands on some activated carbon, and use it the same way as the baking soda.

IF that fails too, you might consider resorting to the expensive option

http
://conservationresources.com/Main/section_15/section15_09.htm

FWIW

Don, who once had success with newspaper & baking soda

-- 
"You can tell a man that boozes by the company he chooses"
The Famous Pig Song, Clarke Van Ness
263890 William Ghio <bghio@m...> 2017‑11‑13 Re: Ozone and musty antique furniture
> On Nov 12, 2017, at 5:50 PM, Don Schwartz  wrote:
> 
> On 2017-11-12 12:40 PM, Michael Parrish wrote:
>> I have a few antique wooden furniture items, including a 80-100 year old
thread cabinet that I inherited from my dear grandmother.  They've unfortunately
been living in my garage for the last year because I have a musty odor that I
can't seem to get rid of. Strictly
> 
> Not sure this will work, but it would be cheap and easy to try. Remove the
cabinet from the garage. Fill the cabinet drawers with dry, loosely crumpled
clean newspaper. Give it some time, then replace the newspaper. If this brings
little joy, build a plastic tent around the cabinet, and put saucers of baking
soda in the drawers and under the cabinet. Maximize the surface area of the
baking soda exposed to the air. Replace baking soda after a week or so. If that
doesn't do it, try to get your hands on some activated carbon, and use it the
same way as the baking soda.
> 
> IF that fails too, you might consider resorting to the expensive option
> 
> > 
http://conservationresources.com/Main/section_15/section15_09.htm
> 

I had such an issue and was recommended to flush w/ vinegar and then trays of
ground coffee. Took a while and another pound of coffee, but it worked.

Bill
263922 Kirk Eppler <eppler.kirk@g...> 2017‑11‑13 Re: Interesting video on wooden mitre plane
On Sun, Nov 12, 2017 at 12:40 PM,  wrote:

> I was quite interested in this, but I think I'll build a smoother first.
>
> > https://www.youtube.co
m/watch?v=4mfd_YmOI2M



 Steve Knight built those mouth closers into his planes. [ I just picked up
a used Jointer last week (Thanks Joe) to add to the fleet]

Here's the mouth of my smoother.  His you just slide up, rather than plane
the back side.
https://kirkh
mb.smugmug.com/Woodworking/Planes/i-gnWJqwP

And the underside of the same plane
https://kirkh
mb.smugmug.com/Woodworking/Planes/i-RQDG8DZ

-- 
Kirk Eppler, just finishing lunch and a presentation with minutes to spare.
263923 <gtgrouch@r...> 2017‑11‑13 Re: Interesting video on wooden mitre plane
That has to leave a fabulous surface. Can you read a newspaper through the
shavings?

Thanks for sharing, Gary Katsanis
Albion New York, USA

(who now has yet another tool on the 'to find' list)
---- Kirk Eppler  wrote: 

=============
On Sun, Nov 12, 2017 at 12:40 PM,  wrote:

> I was quite interested in this, but I think I'll build a smoother first.
>
> > https://www.youtube.co
m/watch?v=4mfd_YmOI2M



 Steve Knight built those mouth closers into his planes. [ I just picked up
a used Jointer last week (Thanks Joe) to add to the fleet]

Here's the mouth of my smoother.  His you just slide up, rather than plane
the back side.
https://kirkh
mb.smugmug.com/Woodworking/Planes/i-gnWJqwP

And the underside of the same plane
https://kirkh
mb.smugmug.com/Woodworking/Planes/i-RQDG8DZ

-- 
Kirk Eppler, just finishing lunch and a presentation with minutes to spare.
263953 Darrell & Kathy <larchmont@s...> 2017‑11‑15 Re: website tool descriptions
Galoots
nothing to add except a digression, down memory lane...

A fair number of years ago a few of us local Galoots were at a
tool auction, and there were DOZENS of shoulder planes.
One of them was skewed, and yeah, it was like 20-25 degrees.
Really obvious.
As the auctioneer worked his way through the shoulder planes
he was going on choice in order.  So if you won lot X you had to
say how many you wanted at that price, and then they would
move on to the next unsold lot number.  A bit confusing for some
but not for Craig.  He noted the lot# of the skewed plane, and
bid on the one just before it.  The auctioneer says "How many?"
and Craig says quite deliberately "Two please".  The handler
picked up the pair of planes and everyone saw the very obvious
skewed mouth.  A chorus of groans erupted from the bidders
who had all been waiting on this lot.  We bin had.

Nicely played, Craig.  Nicely played.


On 12/11/2017 4:49 AM, Ed Minch wrote:
> What he said.  Skewing is usually in the 20-25° range and if this is  > skewed
it is only a couple of degrees. > > Ed Minch > > > > >> On Nov 12,
2017, at 1:50 AM, Don Schwartz  wrote: >> >> Way too subtle for 
me. Looking at the pic of the sole with the >> image zoomed, it seems to me that
the edges of the mouth are >> parallel to the trailing edge of the sole. That 
says to me there's >> no skewing. >> >> FWIW >> >> Don >
-- 
Darrell LaRue
Oakville ON
Wood Hoarder, Blade Sharpener, and Occasional Tool User
263958 paul womack <pwomack@p...> 2017‑11‑15 Re: website tool descriptions
Darrell & Kathy wrote:
> Galoots
> nothing to add except a digression, down memory lane...
>
> A fair number of years ago a few of us local Galoots were at a
> tool auction, and there were DOZENS of shoulder planes.
> One of them was skewed, and yeah, it was like 20-25 degrees.
> Really obvious.
> As the auctioneer worked his way through the shoulder planes
> he was going on choice in order.  So if you won lot X you had to
> say how many you wanted at that price, and then they would
> move on to the next unsold lot number.  A bit confusing for some
> but not for Craig.  He noted the lot# of the skewed plane, and
> bid on the one just before it.  The auctioneer says "How many?"
> and Craig says quite deliberately "Two please".  The handler
> picked up the pair of planes and everyone saw the very obvious
> skewed mouth.  A chorus of groans erupted from the bidders
> who had all been waiting on this lot.  We bin had.
>
> Nicely played, Craig.  Nicely played.

In fairness the auctioneer made a HUGE mistake. Craig merely
exploited it. The process the auctioneer invoked is called (in the UK)
selling "with the option".

It's often used when selling (say) 30 pieces of timber.

(It can be important to know this phrase, and what it means, when attending an
auction)

   BugBear
263959 Ed Minch <ruby1638@a...> 2017‑11‑15 Re: website tool descriptions
Her in the mid-Atlantic they offer “choice” based on the whole group.  If there
is one item that is exceptional, it drives the price for the first round, and
the winning bid can take as many out of the group as she wants.  I recently
bought a Swan drawknife out of a group of about 75 laid out on a table - the
first bid was $60 IIRC, by the time it got to $10 fI was in, and later they were
going in lots of 5 for $20.

Ed Minch

Recent Search Bios FAQ