OldTools Archive

Recent Search Bios FAQ

263471 Erik Levin 2017‑10‑09 Cast iron sash weights
After entirely too much time digging through the archives without finding an
answer, I will pose the general question:

Any good uses for old sash weights? 

I have a large enough collection that I can't even slide the crate without  a
Johnson bar, and, if there is a use, I would prefer that to the $10 I'll get at
the scrap yard in the current market, and they sit on CL forever, even at below
scrap price. I pulled the best looking two or  three to hold on to as
material/weight for future needs, but the other 50 to 100 (some windows had
extras at the bottom of the pocket, so #windows*4 doesn't do it for a number...
I have no clue why, but I have some guesses) need to go if there is no practical
use.
 No, I'm not putting back the single pane double-hungs in my house.... *** This
message was sent from a convenience email service, and the reply address(es) may
not match the originating address
263472 Mike Rock <mikerock@m...> 2017‑10‑10 Re: Cast iron sash weights
Great for holding down duck decoys, or better, goose decoys :)

On 10/9/2017 5:43 PM, Erik Levin via OldTools wrote:
> After entirely too much time digging through the archives without finding an
answer, I will pose the general question:
>
> Any good uses for old sash weights?
>
> I have a large enough collection that I can't even slide the crate without  a
Johnson bar, and, if there is a use, I would prefer that to the $10 I'll get at
the scrap yard in the current market, and they sit on CL forever, even at below
scrap price. I pulled the best looking two or  three to hold on to as
material/weight for future needs, but the other 50 to 100 (some windows had
extras at the bottom of the pocket, so #windows*4 doesn't do it for a number...
I have no clue why, but I have some guesses) need to go if there is no practical
use.
>   No, I'm not putting back the single pane double-hungs in my house.... ***
This message was sent from a convenience email service, and the reply
address(es) may not match the originating address
> ------------------------------------------------------------------------
> OldTools is a mailing list catering to the interests of hand tool
> aficionados, both collectors and users, to discuss the history, usage,
> value, location, availability, collectibility, and restoration of
> traditional handtools, especially woodworking tools.
>
> To change your subscription options:
> > https:/
/oldtools.swingleydev.com/mailman/listinfo/oldtools
>
> To read the FAQ:
> > https://swingleydev.com/a
rchive/faq.html
>
> > OldTools archive: https://swingleydev.
com/ot/
>
> OldTools@s...


---
This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
https://www.avast.com/antivirus
263473 Mike Rock <mikerock@m...> 2017‑10‑10 Re: Cast iron sash weights
And speaking of duck/goose/waterfowl decoys.
When I was much younger, we had a ranch in ND.  When we bought it there 
were a couple dozen old refrigerator railroad cars there, sans wheels 
and stuff.  They were insulated and you  put the blocks of ice in on the 
top openings.  You could pretty much put thirty or forty big blocks of 
ice in there, ten from each opening.  The overhead supports for the ice 
ran down the walls, sloping toward the middle of the car so the ice slid 
down to the middle.
These were the days when a kid knew every railroad car and it's type, 
tonnage and railroad logo.  And the old wooden cars were everywhere 
then.  We used to watch the Big Boys bringing the wheat harvest up the 
slope and across western North Dakota.  Two of them on each train.  
Wheat headed for the ports in Superior and Duluth.

Anyhow........all that cold was in there, along with swinging beef, 
courtesy of the insulation, which was SIX INCH thick cork inside the 
walls.  SIX INCH!!!  Man, that was an old decoy carver's heaven on 
earth.  When we scrapped one car a fellow actually paid for all the 
cork, and there was a huge pile of it.....tons actually.  Each block was 
about 2 feet by four feet by six inches thick.  Don't remember what held 
it all together but is was sure waterproof.

Dream on that, you decoy men!!

Like they say, hindsight is 20-20....



---
This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
https://www.avast.com/antivirus
263475 Ed Minch <ruby1638@a...> 2017‑10‑10 Re: Cast iron sash weights
GGG

Mike - you are very lucky to have seen that.  Eighth picture down - Holy Crap

https://oldmachinepress.com/2016/12/20/union-pacific-4-8-8-4-big-
boy-locomotive/ <https://oldmachinepress.com/2016/12/20
/union-pacific-4-8-8-4-big-boy-locomotive/>


serious horsepower.  In the 1950’s my dad took us down to the tracks in Berea,
Ohio (a town so small it did not have a square, but rather a triangle) at 7:15
after dinner to watch the Twentieth Century Limited go by on its way to Chicago
- real fast.

> On Oct 9, 2017, at 8:38 PM, Mike Rock  wrote:
> 
> Two of them on each train.  

Ed Minch
263476 Mike Rock <mikerock@m...> 2017‑10‑10 Re: Cast iron sash weights
They were awesome then, and the memories are something wonderful. My 
uncle Irv was there narrating the whole thing the first time. They came 
by every day.  There was a lot of wheat flowing from Montana and ND at 
that time.  Saw the last of the threshing rigs running, a few steamers 
left, mostly big Rumely's.  That is one thumping big tractor to run the 
big threshing rigs.  My grandpa still had some teams left then, the 
early fifties.  He traded a lot of horses in his time.  That's where I 
first handled a team, learned to shoe and very certainly to clinch every 
nail as soon as driven. To have a Belgian horse take it's foot back when 
you mid direct a nail and hit a nerve, and have a few unclinched nails 
sticking your way.....well, it's very bloody.  Makes you a fast learner!

God bless.

On 10/9/2017 8:00 PM, Ed Minch wrote:
> GGG
>
> Mike - you are very lucky to have seen that.  Eighth picture down - 
> Holy Crap
>
> https://oldmachinepress.com/2016/12/20/union-pacific-4-8-8-4-big-
boy-locomotive/
>
>
> serious horsepower.  In the 1950’s my dad took us down to the tracks 
> in Berea, Ohio (a town so small it did not have a square, but rather a 
> triangle) at 7:15 after dinner to watch the Twentieth Century Limited 
> go by on its way to Chicago - real fast.
>
>> On Oct 9, 2017, at 8:38 PM, Mike Rock > <mailto:mikerock@m...>> wrote:
>>
>> Two of them on each train.
>
> Ed Minch



---
This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
https://www.avast.com/antivirus
263478 <gtgrouch@r...> 2017‑10‑10 Re: Cast iron sash weights
How would you handle shipping to western New York? I have an 1850s house with
about 30 windows and there are a few missing weights here and there.

Thanks, Gary K
---- Erik Levin via OldTools  wrote: 

=============
After entirely too much time digging through the archives without finding an
answer, I will pose the general question:

Any good uses for old sash weights? 

I have a large enough collection that I can't even slide the crate without  a
Johnson bar, and, if there is a use, I would prefer that to the $10 I'll get at
the scrap yard in the current market, and they sit on CL forever, even at below
scrap price. I pulled the best looking two or  three to hold on to as
material/weight for future needs, but the other 50 to 100 (some windows had
extras at the bottom of the pocket, so #windows*4 doesn't do it for a number...
I have no clue why, but I have some guesses) need to go if there is no practical
use.
 No, I'm not putting back the single pane double-hungs in my house.... *** This
message was sent from a convenience email service, and the reply address(es) may
not match the originating address
------------------------------------------------------------------------
OldTools is a mailing list catering to the interests of hand tool
aficionados, both collectors and users, to discuss the history, usage,
value, location, availability, collectibility, and restoration of
traditional handtools, especially woodworking tools.

To change your subscription options:
https://old
tools.swingleydev.com/mailman/listinfo/oldtools

To read the FAQ:
https://swingleydev.com/archi
ve/faq.html

OldTools archive: https://swingleydev.com/
ot/

OldTools@s...
263480 Erik Levin 2017‑10‑10 Re: Cast iron sash weights
Gary asked:> How would you handle shipping to western New York? I have an 1850s
house with
> about 30 windows and there are a few missing weights here and there. I'd bet
you can find them locally on CL for less than shipping, but if not, feel free to
contact me directly via email. A real quick search shows new can be had for
about $2.50/lb, but in modern square section stackable. I didn't see any
traditional style round-with-eye type. None listed on CL ithaca or rochester,
though there are several listings  in my area that have not moved for several
months. I'd have to mass them to be sure, but, as I recall,I have 4lb, 6lb, and
maybe some heavier.


*** This message was sent from a convenience email service, and the reply
address(es) may not match the originating address
263510 Michael Suwczinsky <nicknaylo@g...> 2017‑10‑12 Re: Cast iron sash weights
I've heard tale of square or squarish sash weights being made of old
wrought iron, while the round, cylindrical type are cast iron.  Years of
poking thru the pile at my local recycler never yielded anything but the
cast weights and I gave up.  Looking for wrought iron on the West Coast has
proven to be a fools errand outside of Gold Country it seems.
I kept a cast iron sash weight on a roller chain as a hold down across my
anvil, at least till a more convenient cannon ball-with-a-ring showed up.

Michael-with Beijing level air quality in San Francisco.

On Mon, Oct 9, 2017 at 6:52 PM, Erik Levin via OldTools <
oldtools@s...> wrote:

> Gary asked:> How would you handle shipping to western New York? I have an
> 1850s house with
> > about 30 windows and there are a few missing weights here and there. I'd
> bet you can find them locally on CL for less than shipping, but if not,
> feel free to contact me directly via email. A real quick search shows new
> can be had for about $2.50/lb, but in modern square section stackable. I
> didn't see any traditional style round-with-eye type. None listed on CL
> ithaca or rochester, though there are several listings  in my area that
> have not moved for several months. I'd have to mass them to be sure, but,
> as I recall,I have 4lb, 6lb, and maybe some heavier.
>
>
> *** This message was sent from a convenience email service, and the reply
> address(es) may not match the originating address
> ------------------------------------------------------------------------
> OldTools is a mailing list catering to the interests of hand tool
> aficionados, both collectors and users, to discuss the history, usage,
> value, location, availability, collectibility, and restoration of
> traditional handtools, especially woodworking tools.
>
> To change your subscription options:
> > https:/
/oldtools.swingleydev.com/mailman/listinfo/oldtools
>
> To read the FAQ:
> > https://swingleydev.com/a
rchive/faq.html
>
> > OldTools archive: https://swingleydev.
com/ot/
>
> OldTools@s...
>



-- 
Michael Suwczinsky

Recent Search Bios FAQ