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197794 Thomas Conroy <booktoolcutter@y...> 2009‑11‑12 Whatsit: Double team skiprope for gerbils?
Galooteratti:

This whatsit turned up in a bindery, but a query on Jeff Peachey's blog
brought no recognition from bookbinders:

http://jeffpeachey.wordpress.com/

So far the best suggestion seems to be Gary Roberts': "Double team
skiprope for gerbils?" But I can't help seeing an actual usable tool in
it. Maybe it isn't a binding tool and someone will recognize it.

Tom Conroy Berkeley


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197797 "Bill Taggart" <w.taggart@v...> 2009‑11‑12 RE: Whatsit: Double team skiprope for gerbils?
 

::-----Original Message-----
::From: oldtools-bounces@r... 
::[mailto:oldtools-bounces@r...] On Behalf Of 
::Thomas Conroy
::Sent: Thursday, November 12, 2009 7:01 PM
::To: oldtools@r...
::Subject: [OldTools] Whatsit: Double team skiprope for gerbils?

::This whatsit turned up in a bindery, but a query on Jeff 
::Peachey's blog brought no recognition from bookbinders:
::
::http://jeffpeachey.wordpress.com/

Clearly a cheese slicer. 

- Bill T.

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197803 "James J.B.N. DuPrie" <j.duprie@c...> 2009‑11‑13 RE: Whatsit: Double team skiprope for gerbils?
Looks like a cutter for soap blocks. I use guitar strings on mine, but I
tend to make fairly hard soap..
-J

-----Original Message-----
From: oldtools-bounces@r...
[mailto:oldtools-bounces@r...] On Behalf Of Thomas Conroy
Sent: Thursday, November 12, 2009 7:01 PM
To: oldtools@r...
Subject: [OldTools] Whatsit: Double team skiprope for gerbils?

Galooteratti:

This whatsit turned up in a bindery, but a query on Jeff Peachey's blog
brought no recognition from bookbinders:

http://jeffpeachey.wordpress.com/

So far the best suggestion seems to be Gary Roberts': "Double team skiprope
for gerbils?"  But I can't help seeing an actual usable tool in it. Maybe it
isn't a binding tool and someone will recognize it.

Tom Conroy
Berkeley

      
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197806 scott grandstaff <scottg@s...> 2009‑11‑13 Re: Whatsit: Double team skiprope for gerbils?
James J.B.N. DuPrie wrote:
> Looks like a cutter for soap blocks. I use guitar strings

  That's what I was thinking too. Soft new soap or a cutter for soft 
cheeze blocks.
  yours Scott

*******************************
    Scott Grandstaff
    Box 409 Happy Camp, Ca  96039
    scottg@s...
    http://www.snowcrest.net/kitty/sgrandstaff/
    http://www.snowcrest.net/kitty/hpages/index.html

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197805 Tom Dugan <tom_dugan@h...> 2009‑11‑13 RE: Whatsit: Double team skiprope for gerbils?
Looks like something that would be used to keep a book open at a
given page without using your hands. And it's adjustable for
different size books.

A little lightweight for the task=2C maybe=2C but that's my guess and
I'm sticking with it.

-T

> Date: Thu=2C 12 Nov 2009 16:01:16 -0800 From: booktoolcutter@y... To:
> oldtools@r... Subject: [OldTools] Whatsit: Double team skiprope for
> gerbils?
>>>> Galooteratti:
>> This whatsit turned up in a bindery=2C but a query on Jeff Peachey's
>> blog brought no recognition from bookbinders:
>> http://jeffpeachey.wordpress.com/ So far the best suggestion seems to
>> be Gary Roberts': "Double team skiprope for gerbils?" But I can't
>> help seeing an actual usable tool in it. Maybe it isn't a binding
>> tool and someone will recognize it. Tom Conroy
> Berkeley
>>>>>      > -----------------------------------------------------------
>>>>>      > -------------
> OldTools is a mailing list catering to the interests of hand tool
> aficionados=2C both collectors and users=2C to discuss the history=2C
> usage=2C value=2C location=2C availability=2C collectibility=2C and
> restoration of traditional handtools=2C especially woodworking tools.
>> To change your subscription options:
> http://ruckus.law.cornell.edu/mailman/listinfo/oldtools
>> To read the FAQ:
> http://swingleydev.com/archive/faq.html
>> OldTools archive: http://swingleydev.com/archive/ OldTools@r...
> http://ruckus.law.cornell.edu/mailman/listinfo/oldtools
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197796 Peter Robinson <peter.robinson.old.tools@g...> 2009‑11‑13 Re: Whatsit: Double team skiprope for gerbils?
Thomas Conroy wrote:
> This whatsit turned up in a bindery, but a query on Jeff 
> Peachey's blog brought no recognition from bookbinders:
> http://jeffpeachey.wordpress.com/

That looks like it might be for marking out an ellipse (I think) by 
running a pencil or perhaps an awl, along the string.

It seems I'm all for wild speculation today!

regards, Peter

Peter Robinson
in Brisbane, Australia
still slowly working on my spokeshave index
http://peterrobinson.galootcentral.com/spokeshaves/
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197810 Kirk Eppler <eppler.kirk@g...> 2009‑11‑13 Re: Whatsit: Double team skiprope for gerbils?
scott grandstaff wrote:
> James J.B.N. DuPrie wrote:
>> Looks like a cutter for soap blocks. I use guitar strings
>
>  That's what I was thinking too. Soft new soap or a cutter for soft 
> cheeze blocks.
>  yours Scott
>
Would you really use thread to cut the cheese (sorry, bad pun 
intended)?  Stainless wire I could see, and that was my first thought.  
But with all the slack, and thread, I didn't go there.

-- 
Kirk Eppler in HMB, did some hunting with Joe J today, only slightly successful
Pharmaceutical and Packaging Engineering
eppler.kirk@g...

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197811 scott grandstaff <scottg@s...> 2009‑11‑13 Re: Whatsit: Double team skiprope for gerbils?
> Would you really use thread to cut the cheese

Well, if we are 85 years before the invention of stainless wire?
and that string was major tough stuff and the cheeze warm and soft??  maybe!

  I have cut a lot of cheeze. hee hehe
40-50 pound blocks.
  And with plain steel wire on two short stubs of broomstick.
Wrap around once and pull! This is better than trying to go straight 
through but the cheeze was cold (cutting cold cheeze really sucks) and 
mostly mozzarella, so not exactly warm soft cheeze I could cut like the 
breeze.
    Ripping the cold hard cheddar is no picnik either.

  But at the creamery they sell curds.
  One day old cheddar thats still warm, salty and kind of squeaks when 
it meets your teeth.
They line up out to the street to get it on wednesday, 10 am, and nobody 
gets more than 2 pounds, and its sold out before noon.
    But damn, its cheeze.
  yours Scott
-- 
*******************************
    Scott Grandstaff
    Box 409 Happy Camp, Ca  96039
    scottg@s...
    http://www.snowcrest.net/kitty/sgrandstaff/
    http://www.snowcrest.net/kitty/hpages/index.html

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197812 Thomas Conroy <booktoolcutter@y...> 2009‑11‑13 RE: Whatsit: Double team skiprope for gerbils?
Galoots:

> ::This whatsit turned up in a bindery, but a query on Jeff
>
> ::Peachey's blog brought no recognition from bookbinders:
> ::
> ::http://jeffpeachey.wordpress.com/

To me, what seems most mysterious about it is that the blocks holding
the strings can't be fixed in place, and the strings are slack. This is
why I don't think it could actually have been used for slicing anything,
though it certainly looks like that. In fact, I can't think of anything
except a Hawaiian guitar where "slack-string" would be appropriate
description, and even in that case it is probably less description than
name. Still bemused.

Tom Conroy


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198271 Scott Stager <stagers@m...> 2009‑11‑25 Re: Whatsit: Double team skiprope for gerbils?
Reverse the position of the two vertical pieces (containing the string  
holders).  That will put the string attachments on the outside which  
will tighten the strings considerably. jj

Then, are there tiny groves in the bottoms of the pointy pieces.

If so the strings placed in those would be really tight, and would be  
way down at the bottom and cut a piece of cheese all the way through  
to the cutting board.

Pure speculation from mediocre photos.

--Scott

On Nov 13, 2009, at 3:35 PM, Thomas Conroy wrote:

> Galoots:
>
>> ::This whatsit turned up in a bindery, but a query on Jeff
>>
>> ::Peachey's blog brought no recognition from bookbinders:
>> ::
>> ::http://jeffpeachey.wordpress.com/
>
> To me, what seems most mysterious about it is that the blocks  
> holding the strings can't be fixed in place, and the strings are  
> slack. This is why I don't think it could actually have been used  
> for slicing anything, though it certainly looks like that. In fact,  
> I can't think of anything except a Hawaiian guitar where "slack- 
> string" would be appropriate description, and even in that case it  
> is probably less description than name. Still bemused.
>
> Tom Conroy
>
>
>
> ------------------------------------------------------------------------
> OldTools is a mailing list catering to the interests of hand tool
> aficionados, both collectors and users, to discuss the history, usage,
> value, location, availability, collectibility, and restoration of
> traditional handtools, especially woodworking tools.
>
> To change your subscription options:
> http://ruckus.law.cornell.edu/mailman/listinfo/oldtools
>
> To read the FAQ:
> http://swingleydev.com/archive/faq.html
>
> OldTools archive: http://swingleydev.com/archive/
>
> OldTools@r...
> http://ruckus.law.cornell.edu/mailman/listinfo/oldtools

-------------------------------------------------
Scott Stager
Columbia Missouri

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